fraukeil


Dodaj komentarz

The Culture Wars that Never Existed

The year 2013 in Poland was marked, some would argue that “plagued” is a more apposite word, by a series of unrest-inspiring events that curtailed the liberty of artists and frequently verged on (almost pre-emptive) censorship. Having waxed personal on the subject of the newly-elected Pope Francis and – more importantly – posted her comment on her own Facebook profile (mind you, her private one rather than the Theatre’s), Ewa Wójciak, the director of the legendary, independent Poznań-based Theatre of the Eighth Day (Teatr Ósmego Dnia), bore the brunt of media onslaught and interlocked hostility of local politicians; there was also an attempt to have her deposed from the job. Eventually, in December 2013 the Theatre lost 30% of its municipal funding. In the November of 2013, Jacek Markiewicz’s “Adoration” (“Adoracja”), a 1993 video film/art showing a naked man adoring the figure of crucified Christ, was shown at the Centre for Contemporary Art in Warsaw, resulting in weeks of vocal protests held by people “whose religious sentiment was offended”. Wielding banners emblazoned with slogans such as “God, Honour, Fatherland” (“Bóg, honor, ojczyzna”), they gathered outside of the Centre and recited the rosary for days on end while in the Polish Seym representatives of the Counter-secularisation Parliamentary Committee (Zespół ds przeciwdziałania ateizacji Polski) demanded the immediate shutdown of the exhibition.

The final straw came when one of the protesters splashed red paint (!) on the wall on which Markiewicz’s video art was projected. The eleventh of November (the official Independence Day in Poland infamous for acts of right-wing aggression happening on a regular basis in recent years) saw yet another instance of the burning of the rainbow in Warsaw’s Zbawiciela Square (the rainbow is an art object plaited out of flowers by Julita Wójcik). Two days later, in Cracow right-wing activists, including journalists and wannabe artists, commenced their absurd protests in the Old Theatre as well as started to publish in the “Gazeta Polska” weekly libellous articles containing purposefully misconstrued information and leaks. What fell victim to the media brouhaha was “Nie-boska. Szczątki”, a play directed by Oliver Frljić, which was being rehearsed and prepared at that time in the Old Theatre. Citing their wish to protect the cast and the crew involved in the play, the directors of the Theatre decided – clearly against Frljić’s will – to cancel the oncoming premiere.

In 2013 in Lublin, there were systematic attempts to impose systemic constraints on the work of curator and activist Szymon Pietrasiewicz, to shut down “Zoom”, a monthly cultural magazine issued by the Centre for Culture in Lublin. All over Poland, among others in Wrocław and in Warsaw, right-wing intruders disrupted lectures of leading Polish intellectuals (Professor Zygmunt Bauman and Professor Magdalena Środa). In the light of these events, the rector of Maria Curie Skłodowska University in Lublin decided to call off the lecture entitled “The Pros and Cons of Anti-clericalism” to be given by Professor Jan Hartman, an employee of Jagiellonian University in Cracow and a philosopher noted for his left-wing leanings. Finally, 2013 saw the emergence and absurd continuation of the Catholic backlash against the so-called “ideology of gender”, masterminded and mediated by conservative activists, who, however, failed to define the meaning of the absurd term of their own coinage.

In the context of the above, Lublin’s cultural and political trajectory seems unique: a traditionally multicultural town (before the Second World War, Lublin was populated by among others Jews, Romanies, Ukrainians, Russians, Armenians and Germans), in the communist times it became one of the hubs of Catholic opposition (among others thanks to the Catholic University of Lublin), only to mutate into a paramount stronghold of Catholic traditionalism and conservative reaction. On the one hand, the authorities of Lublin aim to upgrade this rather stale and staid image by fostering international relations and furthering global cooperation with other municipalities; on the other hand, however, the city of Lublin is painfully lacking in the necessary toolbox that is far more important than on-off/one-off festivals and congresses and that is a prerequisite for long-term engagement with the local community – the on-site beneficiaries of the cultural shift to come. As a result, the reality is harsh: numerous international students enrolled at Lublin’s colleges and universities, highly prominent Ukrainian minority, urban activists, local left-wing organizers, and representatives of the LGBTQ sector are not sensibly endorsed in the public space and/or by the public sector.

Unsurprisingly, it is the overtly political right-wing faction that remains vocal, visible and vindictive. In the December of 2013, the Lublin-based East European Performing Arts Platform that I am the Head of was threatened, despite being co-funded by such respectable bodies as the City of Lublin and the Adam Mickiewicz Institute in Warsaw, with having its municipal financial support withdrawn due to showing Xavier Le Roy’s “Low Pieces” two months ago at the Theatre Confrontations Festival (Konfrontacje Teatralne) in Lublin that Grzegorz Reske and myself officially curate. Alas, the play was not found by the local politicians to be contestable, too intriguing, too convoluted or even too controversial (quite typically, no representative of the local authorities attended the performance whatsoever). It all boiled down to the December proposal of the City’s Council to pass the motion regarding “the creation and cultivation of a positive educational climate that would be suitable for the development of the young generation of the residents of Lublin”, which in turn entails among others promotion “art of superior aesthetics and characterized by equally uplifting worldview” as well as “ceasing to finance by the City of Lublin works of art and cultural events that disturb the sense of habitual propriety and propagating scandalizing contents”. On 19 December, the Council’s postulate was followed up by a most astonishing incident: Xavier Le Roy, alongside his dancers that participated in “Low Pieces”, became the focal point of the councilors’ meeting as one of the right-wing politicians projected photos of naked dancers (accompanying them with an image of a cross as well as a landscape painting of a deer) onto a wall and objected to financing the EEPAP if the performing arts look like the scenes from “Low Pieces”. After a month of negotiations, the case of EEPAP was finally resolved amiably and the project is still going strong. Naturally, we all would like to see the day (unlike some of the councilors who are more likely to rue the day) when performing arts by default approximated the high quality of “Low Pieces”. I would not be writing here about this, after all minor, debacle if this episode did not constitute a symptom of a more widespread and much more dangerous phenomenon.

All the above-mentioned incidents were stoked by the fire of political opportunism and were often played out by the sensationalism-hungry media. There was no genuine debate save for petty bickering; in fact, there is no place for serious public discussion on the state of the arts in Poland right now. All the events started in a cookie-cutter manner: a gesture of political concern was performed by one party only (pun intended!): an MP representing the Law and Justice Party (Prawo i Sprawiedliwość is one of the two major parties in Poland) attacked “Adoration”; Poznań-based politicians angrily commented on Ewa Wójciak’s Facebook post; disturbance during the performance of “Do Damaszku” at the Old Theatre in Cracow was instigated by shouts of “Scandal! Disgrace!” (“Skandal! Hańba!”); councilman Pitucha’s statement regarding the performing arts in Lublin. The list goes on. And on. And on and on.

Any attack is prone to a counter-attack; quarrels generate further escalation of conflict while talks are more peace-oriented – it is through respectful dialogue that sustained (and sustainable) growth is achieved. In this sense, we are at war in Poland; it is a war of attrition, is it a culture war of exhaustion waged, simplification notwithstanding, by nationalism-driven, right-wing Catholics and representatives of the critical left and the LGBTQ movement. The frontline is palpable and so are lines of demarcation – ever since the plane crash in Smolensk conversation between these two dichotomies has not been possible.

However, what divides them is not a series of ideological (political) issues but the direct consensus-defying consequences of the post-1989 transition and the yawning gap between the haves and the have-nots in Poland. The culture war is class strife incarnate as after the dismantling of communism capitalism has been introduced in its most ruthlessly dominant and neoliberal version. Opting to model the newly-fangled Poland on the North American template, the powers that be scrapped the social capital generated by the Solidarity movement. There was no time and no place to secure the social rights of the most disenfranchised (for instance, the former employees of once state and now privatized and/or closed factories, mines and shipyards). In short, to lay the foundation for social solidarity. Instead, extreme individualism, “working for one’s own benefit” and propaganda of profiteering have colonized the public discourse, the language of mass education, the idiom of the street, and the parlance of business. Even universities have succumbed to the new canon. As a result, as seen by poet Jarosław Marek Rymkiewicz, who is a steadfast supporter of the Law and Justice Party, there are two Polands: but not, as he wants, the Republic of Poland is bifurcated not into the liberals and the conservatives, rather into the Republic of Losers (those who lag behind or who have been left behind) and the Reprivate of Winners (those who have made it, who have made it big, and who are in control of their socio-economic status).

To my mind, ideological squabble is a smoke screen, a type of pressure valve in the times of accelerating socio-economic inequality and the complacency of myopic middle classes. A case in point is a TV debate between Michał Żebrowski, an actor-turned-celebrity, a star of historical and period films, TV series, high-profile advertisements, and the owner of a light, i.e., entertainment- and box office-oriented, theatre in Warsaw and Paweł Demirski, a playwright and a representative of the critical left. Full of mutual accusations and characterized by heightened emotionality, their conversation was a discussion of members of two opposite circles, who employ a totally different language system, who have come to absolutely divergent conclusions and who in practice live in two disparate countries, which only happen to share its capital city.

What strikes me about this debate is the scarcity of questions concerning the very capitalist system, the price we have paid for our relative wealth, peace and quiet in the European Union, and the model of democracy we adhere to; if these questions do occur, they are articulated sheepishly and swept onto the margins of privatized public consciousness (and, well, debate). Surely, all of this comes as no surprise: the 1990s and the early 2000s were the years of blind faith – of believing in the axioms of capitalism as the manifestation of the most efficient and noble version of democracy; capitalism was the harbinger of wealth, welfare and wellness. Hoping to reach the higher heights of Western lifestyle, we believed so desperately and invested so much that the real-life destruction of our dream and dogma is unacceptable; the irony of it all is cruel, indeed.

Obviously, the harshness of Polish reality is omnipresent: for years, we have been governed by two similar parties (a right-wing and a center-right one) that are major cynical players, stoking up the fire of their fictional and deflated fight that has almost monopolized the airwaves, sidelining to the periphery the remaining political pretenders and guaranteeing the hegemony of the BIG two. The effect of this division is blatantly visible in the media: the absurd quarrel of the indestructible birch tree in Smolensk domineered more pressing issues, such as crossed is public schools, in vitro fertilization, and civil partnerships. The debate that takes place is a decoy as it cannot be called an ideologically sound one: the entrenched keep on tossing verbal grenades and the fundamental dividing line is the one that separates Smolensk sceptics from Smolensk believers. The issue of the social costs of transition is absent from political mainstream; lately it has percolated into non-mainstream media.

The repercussions felt by the creative sector in Poland are painfully visible. Firstly, as diagnosed by Joanna Krakowska in her “Ahistoryczne, krytyczne” (“Ahistorical, critical”), critical art has ceased to exist in the face of culture wars since censorship meted out by politicians force the art world to be, quite often superficially and only seemingly, united with the attacked artists, which calcifies the black-and-white landscape, making null and void any attempt at self-reflexivity. Secondly, ideological strife and different evaluation of the contemporary socio-economic situation in Poland and, most importantly, the precarious working conditions experienced by artists and producers of culture deepen the already present internal divisions among the theatre and dance theatre professionals. This inevitably slows down the momentum of the theatre world and compromises the struggle for securing even the most fundamental rights (freedom of artistic expression, defiance in the face of censorship, fight for employment rights of artists, etc.). Paweł Wodziński, a theatre director, scenographer and researcher, fittingly summarized this non-debate debate as follows:

“My extensive experience has taught me that the theatre in Poland is poorly and unwell, and that theatre professionals are challenged by their narrow understanding of freedom and by their limited agency. Fighting an overall losing battle, they lose their social and political footing, and make themselves the sole target of their own aggression. They treat the theatre not a space of liberty but as a gladiatorial arena where a barbaric fight for their own status is fought with a vengeance; unfortunately, they fail to see that most often they are fighting for scraps. Meanwhile, almost unbeknownst to them, the real world is ruthlessly and realistically preoccupied with changing the real-life rules of engagement.” The rules of the end game, one could bitterly add.

translated by Bartosz Wójcik

Article was published at „MASKA Journal” vol. XXIX, No. 165-168 (autumn-winter 2014), http://www.maska.si

 

Reklamy


Dodaj komentarz

Under Pressure: Polish Theater and The Crisis of Public Theater Institutions

The Polish theater has always been lively, reacting to current events, at times naming and indicating numerous phenomena more quickly than experts and observers.

History and Theater in Sync
Most of the political breakthroughs in Poland in the past decades were accompanied by significant theatrical events. Alternative and student theaters as well as political theaters have been developed in response to municipal and national theaters, which have often been used as the mouthpieces for regime powers. The 1968 Polish political crisis [Pol: wydarzenia marcowe 1968], one of the deepest political, social, and culture crises in postwar history of Poland), started after the then government banned productions of the iconic play Dziady directed by Kazimierz Dejmek. In addition, the awareness of my generation—those born in Poland in the 1970s and 1980s—was shaped by the consecutive performances of Krzysztof Warlikowski, which ignited the public debate on the topic of the emancipation of Polish homosexuals. The frequent (and often repetitive) watching of Oczyszczeni (2001) [Eng: Cleansed] or Hamlet by Warlikowski (1999), then connected to the Warsaw-based Teatr Rozmaitości, was a vital experience for a whole generation.

A more contemporary example is the performance by Monika Strzępka and Paweł Demirski, entitled: W imię Jakuba S. [Eng: In the name of Jakub S.] (created in the Dramatic Theater in Warsaw in 2011). It ignited a public debate in Poland concerning the class divisions of Polish society and the embarrassing and notoriously overlooked issue of the eighteenth-century colonization and captivity of the peasants dwelling in the areas currently belonging to Poland, Ukraine, and Belarus by the Polish magnates.

The first decade of the twenty-first century was the time when the new language of the political theater was born in Poland and the main stage was taken over by younger artists. At that time, political theater was no longer using allusion and representation, but rather resorting to new strategies of documentary theater. Examples include: Kiedy przyjdą podpalić dom, to się nie zdziw [Eng.: Do Not Be Surprised When They Come to Set Your House On Fire] by Paweł Demirski (based on the true story of a twenty-one-year-old worker killed by a machine in the Indesit factory in Łódź in 2005, rewritten by Demirski to show how human and workers’ rights are neglected in Polish neoliberal capitalism, even though the system change in Poland in 1989 was possible thanks to the workers’ movement “Solidarność”); Transfer by Jan Klata (premiere 2006) based on accounts of and performed in part by Polish and German witnesses to forced resettlement during World War II; Niech żyje wojna!!! [Eng.: Long Live the War!!!] by Paweł Demirski and Monika Strzępka, one of the most important theater performances in Poland in the last ten years, in which Demirski and Strzępka reset a well-known Polish TV series about the Second World War, deconstructing the images and myths of war as fun to reveal the childish, sentimental stories, which Polish society seems to be so attached to.  Paweł Mościcki, Polish scholar, philosopher, and translator, author of a fundamental book defining a new political theater in Poland Teatr angażujący [Eng.: Engaging Theater]refers to the new standards of engaged theater praxis as an engaging theater.

An Ongoing Debate
The birth of the new Polish political theater was accompanied by the “battle for theater,” the prolonged, heated debate between the conservative critics and those supporting young artists. The public debate, which ran in the Polish media became part of a culture war between the leftists and conservatives aimed to redefine such terms as freedom, society, homeland, politics, as well as to revise the cultural canons and reveal myths and clichés of Polish society. It was mostly in the theater where this extremely important discourse was created and shaped. This debate constituted yet another formative experience for the then young spectators and theater enthusiasts, who, put in the middle of a conflict at the beginning of their theater experience, had to take one or another position. Still, the debate has not yet been resolved.

At the moment, the most audible voice is the voice of those artists, who, tired of accounting for the history of Poland, are sorting out the social mechanisms of remembrance and forgetting (Weronika Szczawińska and Agnieszka Jakimiak, the series Re//mix in the Komuna/Warszawa, curated by Tomasz Plata and Magda Grudzińska), as well as the very means of theatrical expression, which asks about the relationships between the spectator and the artist (Wojtek Ziemilski), borrowing from the visual arts and dance (Komuna/Warszawa, Weronika Szczawińska, Wojtek Ziemilski, Jan Turkowski).

Resetting the Stage
Weronika Szczawińska, nominated in 2014 for a prestigious theater award by the influential weekly Polityka, is one of the most fascinating and courageous theater directors in Poland today. Since 2011 she has worked with dramaturg Agnieszka Jakimiak, actor Piotr Wawer Jr., and musician Krzysztof Kaliski. Her main interests are mechanisms of creating individual and common memory (performance: Jak być kochaną?), deconstructing the clichés of Polish history and culture (W pustyni i w puszczy), and reconstructing biographies, identities, and our images about them.

The Re//mix series, initiated in 2010 by theater scholar and curator Tomasz Plata and theater Komuna Warszawa, curated by Magda Grudzińska until the end of 2013, was one of the most interesting program proposals in Polish theater in recent years. During four seasons, young Polish performing artists were invited to create a performance referencing their masters: an icon, an idol—one they were learning from or were rebelling against. Weronika Szczawińska reconstructed the biography of Polish theater actress and director Lidia Zamkow. Polish choreographer and dancer Mikołaj Mikołajczyk referenced his teacher and master, Henryk Tomaszewski, the choreographer, mime artist, and founder of Wrocław Mime Theater; Wojtek Ziemilski revealed the methods of the Wooster Group; Aleksandra Borys was inspired by Anna Halprin; and Monika Strzępka and Paweł Demirski referenced the work of Dario Fo.

Wojtek Ziemilski is a theater director, performer and teacher, whose performances redefine the positions of artist and spectator, giving the audience freedom and tools to create part of the show. His theater works are highly inspired by conceptual dance and contemporary visual arts, which makes his artistic practice an extraordinary proposal, opening new ways of thinking about what theater might be.

The most interesting productions in Polish theater, such as those mentioned above, establish completely new relationships between the scene and the audience.

The Public Theater and the Demands of the Market
The debate over the state of the institution of the public theater has also been vigorous in recent years. In Poland, the dominating model is a public, repertory theater (most frequently a municipal, state-funded theater), present in almost every big city in the country. Such a public theater can be defined as a theatrical institution with a fixed group of actors and directors working full time, having a full-time technical team and, on-site set design and costume shops. A public theater in Poland is financed from public funds (and subordinated to the local and national government). It is most often operating on the basis of a repertory model and led by an artist (usually a director), rarely by a manager, hiring playwrights and literary managers or dramaturgs. At present, there are 124 public theaters in Poland, including as many as eighteen in Warsaw. Their method of funding (the state, the municipality) has significantly contributed to their outstanding artistic achievement. Their size facilitates experimentation (for example, the rehearsals of the plays directed by Krystian Lupa can last several months) and it does not limit the artistic process for commercial reasons. At least this used to be the case.

After the political transformation of 1989, Poland adopted the aggressive, neoliberal model of capitalism (Polish: turbokapitalizm), which influenced the management of the institutions of culture inherited from the previous political system (the Polish People’s Republic). Public theaters however, did not engage this reform while the local governments tightened their demands, calling for massive commercial successes, higher revenues and the increase in the number of tickets sold. For this reason, many theaters found themselves in a struggle, committing to obsolete productions, and unwilling to consider collaboration with dance, the visual arts, or international programs that include residencies and partnership opportunities.

The high production costs and the costs of participation in various festivals blocked the path towards experimental artistic quests. In the face of the external pressure concerning revenues and attendance, the theater is transformed into a factory of consecutive performances with preposterously strict production time frames. In his breakthrough book entitled Resetting the Stage, Dragan Klaić wrote about this particular phenomenon:

Public theatre professionals talk most willingly about the subsidy versus cost gap and various solutions for closing it, but they rarely want to question the institutional model and the patterns of production and distribution that perpetuate the gap. Globalization has imposed the dominance of the financial perspective in debates on contemporary culture— hence the focus on the cost versus revenue issue and at the same time a reluctance of theatre people to acknowledge the fact that public theatre has become a minority option, one among many, in the deployment of people’s leisure time. The harsh competition between public theatre and the cultural industry with its enormous output of digital products has caused some confusion, even bitterness among practitioners.

Nevertheless, Klaić indicates that this applies not only to Poland but also to many countries in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as Germany—the whole region, in which the nineteenth and twentieth centuries were dominated by the model of a repertory theater:

In Europe, however, a markedly different tradition prevails. …The provisions created after World War II saw theatre as a legitimate beneficiary of the welfare state and an instrument of cultural democratization in Western Europe. Behind the Iron Curtain, in the communist states of Central and Eastern Europe, theatre was pampered as a powerful tool of mass indoctrination.

Today, after the so-called democratic transformation in 1989, which to a huge extent boiled down to the introduction of an aggressive model of capitalism in the post-socialist countries, the public theater succumbs to the mighty pressure of the economists and politicians fond of the neoliberal definition of an auto-regulating market, and therefore, art institutions are expected to fully provide for their own activities as well as strive to curb or radically minimize public subsidies.

In her essay entitled “Radical Museology,” Claire Bishop, Associate Professor in the History of Art department at the CUNY Graduate Center, emphasizes that bringing the culture under the heavy yoke of economics, severely affects arts institutions, which now have to justify their raison d’être to conform to new metrics, converting the culture-producing role of the theater into measurable indicators.

We are missing, as Bishop purports, some alternative assessment modules and discussion methods—some specific tools protecting the institution of the theater from commercialization.

And this is the crucial, perhaps pivotal, paradox of the present day: taking into account the pressures of the market, the cultural institutions postulate the return to the system in which they are financed by the state, which at times can lead to the spread of nationalism and cultural or economic colonization. On the other hand, when the institutions of culture are threatened by nationalistic designs, they defend themselves, resorting to universal values (freedom of speech, artistic cosmopolitism), which in turn have already been commercialized.

Another Week, Another Festival
The situation of the Polish public theater is also greatly influenced by the phenomenon of “Festivalization.” Currently, there are 677 theaters and 408 professional and amateur festivals taking place in Poland. Thus, there is not a single week without several theater festivals. On the one hand, the festivals constitute one of the pillars of Polish theater life: during the festivals the artists can share their experience, exchange business cards, and artists connected to different theaters can watch the work of others and see the impact that their own performances exert over a new audience, within a different context.

On the other hand, the “Festivalization of culture” increases its eventfulness—its transitoriness. Artists are deprived of the possibility of conducting artistic research all year long and instead must prepare, produce, and perform new premieres from one festival to another. But the very same festivals can provide a new, gripping workspace for theater artists: the consciously curated festivals are trying to abandon their festival identity by offering coproduction and residency opportunities to their artists.

A Real Pressure
Undoubtedly, theater still has invaluable critical potential. We must not get stuck in mythic notions or erect a monument to the Polish theater at large—tenderly remembering its enchanting, old history. Instead, we have to provide it with the possibilities for further development. A crisis of our public art institutions offers a chance for change and openness in the long and unpredictable transformation process. This openness is conducive to experiments and trials and can reveal new perspectives and ways of thinking. If we do not make such an effort, artists will not have suitable working conditions and we will be left with a handful of plaintive memories.

translated by Joanna Kurek, edited by Bartosz Wójcik

the article was published on HowlRound.com

– See more at: http://howlround.com/under-pressure-polish-theater-and-the-crisis-of-public-theater-institutions#sthash.WvzPL9fw.dpuf


Dodaj komentarz

Artysta – kurator – producent kultury

 

1.

„Jednym z głównych problemów współczesnych artystów krytycznych jest interakcja z aparatem oddziaływającym na produkcję dzieł sztuki. Na ten aparat składają się parametry odbioru (instytucje, publiczność, społeczności, wspólnoty itp.), jak i potencjał oraz ograniczenia komunikacji w różnych sferach (świat sztuki, media, przestrzeń publiczna, przestrzeń polityczna, itp.). Nawiązywanie, ale i zrywanie, kontaktów. Kwestię tę można poruszać na różne sposoby, począwszy od praktycznego i metodologicznego, czyli dyskusji na temat użycia znaków i przestrzeni w instalacji, debaty nad koncepcją narzędzi i polityki reprezentacji, nad rolą lub też funkcją artysty/autora w konstruowaniu nowych przestrzeni i podmiotowości, to jest alternatywnych sieci lub nawet kontrpubliczności”. (Sheikh, 2004)

Postulat Simona Sheikha, otwierający artykuł Representation, Contestation and Power: The Artist as Public Intellectual, opublikowany w 2004 roku w internetowym czasopiśmie „republicart” (http://republicart.net/disc/aap/sheikh02_en.htm) jest komentarzem do słów Waltera Benjamina, wygłoszonych siedemdziesiąt lat wcześniej w zupełnie innych okolicznościach. Sheikh odwołuje się w swoim tekście do wykładu Bejamina Twórca jako wytwórca, problematyzującego temat relacji sztuki wobec systemu jej produkcji.

Oczywiście, Sheikh wie doskonale, że uproszczone współczesne odczytania Benjamina i dosłowne przekładanie go w realia dzisiejsze do niczego nie prowadzi – kontekst historyczny uniemożliwia bezpośrednie kopiowanie jego pytań i postulatów oraz bezkrytyczne wklejanie ich w dzisiejszą rzeczywistość, nieprzypadkowo jednak w ostatnich latach akurat ten tekst przywoływany jest wyjątkowo często, jest bowiem ważnym punktem odniesienia dla rozważań wokół współczesnych praktyk artystycznych. Kim jest dzisiaj artysta (a także intelektualista, badacz, kurator) jako producent? Jakie są modele jego pracy i jak zmieniła się ich rola w kapitalizmie kognitywnym, opartym na produkcji wiedzy? Kim jest producent kultury (cultural producer), jakie są warunki jego działań, jakie metody podejmowania decyzji, wyborów i jak one z kolei wpływają na obieg sztuki? Pytamy dzisiaj nie tyle, jak kiedyś Benjamin, o rolę dzieła sztuki w procesie produkcji, ale o to, jak wygląda współczesny system produkcji sztuki. Jakie rządzą nim zasady, kto decyduje o wyborze danego artysty i publikacji jego pracy? Kto włącza jednych w międzynarodowy obieg festiwalowy, by innych na długo z niego wykluczyć? To nie są pytania zawieszone w próżni: dotyczą rozmaitych sieci zależności, relacji, powiązań twórców, producentów i odbiorców, które zasadniczo wpływają na przestrzeń współczesnego teatru i tańca.

2.

W tym kontekście warto przyjrzeć się jednemu z bardziej znaczących i wpływowych obecnie twórców kultury: kuratorowi. Zawód ten, wielokrotnie omawiany na gruncie sztuk wizualnych, w teatrze i tańcu obecny jest, na dobrą sprawę, od lat osiemdziesiątych XX wieku, a jego pojawieniu się towarzyszyły zarówno zmiany estetyczne w sztukach performatywnych, jak i przemiany systemu ich produkcji. Lata osiemdziesiąte to czas drugiego zwrotu performatywnego; to wtedy powstawały ważne spektakle Roberta Wilsona, Anne Teresy de Keersmaeker, Roberta Lepage’a. Również wówczas utworzono takie ośrodki produkcji i prezentacji sztuk performatywnych, jak Kaaitheater w Brukseli, BIT Theatergarasjen w Bergen, Kampnagel w Hamburgu. W 1981 roku zainicjowano sieć sztuk performatywnych IETM (wtedy jeszcze skrót rozwijano jako Informal European Theatre Meetings); w 1982 roku Andrzej Wirth założył Instytut Teatrologii Stosowanej w Giessen, gdzie w ciekawy, nowatorski wtedy sposób połączono teorię z praktyką; w roku 1983 Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker założyła grupę Rosas w Brukseli, a w 1986 Jan Lauwers i Grace Ellen Barkey ufundowali Needcompany; w 1987 roku powstał Eurokaz w Zagrzebiu. Inicjatorów tych zmian nie nazywano wówczas kuratorami:

Mówiliśmy wtedy: Tyle fascynujących zmian zachodzi w sztuce i tylu młodych artystów nie ma miejsca, w którym mogliby pokazać swoją pracę.  I tworzyliśmy własne miejsca. […] W tamtym czasie nie zastanawialiśmy się, czy ktoś jest kuratorem, programerem czy dramaturgiem.. […]  Jeśli artyści potrzebowali festiwalu, Hugo de Greef go robił. Jeśli potrzebowali stałej przestrzeni do pracy w Leuven, Guido (Minne) i Theo (van Rompay) tworzyli ją.”. (This curator-producer…, 2010, s. 22-23).

 

Konsekwencje działań ówczesnych aktywistów i artystów dały się zauważyć bardzo szybko, nie tylko w systemie produkcji spektakli, ale również w sposobie ich dystrybucji oraz w języku: “Tworzyli [kuratorzy] nowy styl mówienia o teatrze i tańcu, pisania o performansie. Bardzo szybko przejęli dyskurs i jego prowadzenie.” (This curator-producer…, 2010, s. 23). To przejęcie przez autorów i inicjatorów ówczesnych przemian władzy nad rozmową o sztukach performatywnych odbyło się jednocześnie na płaszczyźnie akademickiej, krytycznej, ale przede wszystkim w samym procesie pracy artystycznej. Podobnie jak w sztukach wizualnych, procesowi temu towarzyszyła krytyka instytucji oraz sposobów przedstawiania, a teatr i taniec szukały nowych przestrzeni, adaptując dla swoich potrzeb m.in. opuszczone budynki poprzemysłowe.

Ciekawym przykładem zachodzących wówczas zmian jest historia Kaaitheater w Brukseli, obecnie jednego z najważniejszych ośrodków sztuk performatywnych w Europie. Kaaitheater powstał w 1977 roku jako międzynarodowe biennale współczesnego teatru i tańca; to wówczas flamandzcy artyści mieli szansę zetknąć się bezpośrednio z pracami najciekawszych twórców na świecie (m.in. Robert Wilson). Szefem festiwalu był od początku Hugo de Greef, który niemal jednocześnie z objęciem dyrekcji festiwalu założył w 1978 roku Schaamte – stowarzyszenie o charakterze zbliżonym do agencji artystycznej, które pracowało z lokalnymi artystami przez cały rok. Festiwal odniósł ogromny sukces, ale dziesięć lat później, po piątej edycji, de Greef oznajmił, że ma dość i zaproponował przekształcenie festiwalu w działający sezonowo ośrodek artystyczny. De Greef już w 1985 roku mówił głośno o tym, że festiwalowy system pracy prowadzi do wyzysku tak artystów, jak i ekipy produkującej wydarzenie, oraz domagał się zainwestowania środków, przeznaczonych dotąd na festiwal, w całoroczną produkcję. Jednocześnie przyznawał, że zwyczajnie wyczerpał go system pracy przy festiwalu, charakteryzujący się brakiem stałego finansowania, koniecznością corocznego rozpoczynania od nowa walki o zdobycie potrzebnych funduszy, a w konsekwencji – brakiem poczucia stabilności pracowników. Poza tym, wobec pojawienia się w latach osiemdziesiątych w Belgii takich ośrodków jak de Singel czy STUK, które zajmowały się m.in. prezentacją spektakli zagranicznych artystów, de Greef uznał formułę festiwalu za wyczerpaną i przekonywał, że wydawanie publicznych pieniędzy powinno się odbywać w systemie całorocznym, z przeznaczeniem na cykliczne produkcje i koprodukcje lokalnych artystów (także we współpracy z zagranicznymi twórcami), na budowanie stabilnej relacji z artystami oraz na tworzenie spójnego kontekstu dla lokalnej sceny performatywnej. Dzięki tym staraniom już w 1987 roku Kaaitheater rozpoczął działalność jako ośrodek niezależnych sztuk performatywnych (stowarzyszenie de Greefa włączono w jego struktury), tworząc warunki pracy artystom, dzięki którym w kolejnych dekadach teatr i taniec flamandzki okażą się jednymi z najważniejszych i najciekawszych na świecie.

Zmiana systemu produkcji sztuki, przeprowadzona wówczas, wymagała trudnej i czasochłonnej współpracy z decydentami odpowiedzialnymi za finansowanie kultury – zadaniem ówczesnych kuratorów było przekonanie ich do zmiany sposobu przekazywania środków na produkcję spektakli. W efekcie tych starań obok teatrów repertuarowych czy festiwali pojawiły się tzw. niezależne centra artystyczne, dzięki czemu złamano dominację teatru repertuarowego jako obowiązującego modelu funkcjonowania publicznej instytucji teatralnej czy tanecznej. Rezultaty tamtych decyzji doskonale widoczne są do dzisiaj: teatr tzw. niezależny (nie-repertuarowy) stanowi rdzeń produkcji artystycznych w Belgii i Holandii. Pozostaje też istotną przeciwwagą dla modelu Stadtheater w Niemczech, będąc jednocześnie źródłem tego, co w tej chwili w niemieckim teatrze najciekawsze (by wymienić chociażby takie ośrodki, jak Kampnagel, Mousontourm czy HAU). Co nie oznacza, że wprowadzony wówczas model okazał się idealny: produkcja artystyczna w tych ośrodkach oparta jest na systemie projektowym, co powoduje uzależnienie artystów i kuratorów od tematyki i politycznego kontekstu rozmaitych grantów, zatrudnianie pracowników na zasadach „elastycznych”, a więc bez widoków na stałą umowę, a wymuszana w ten sposób ciągła mobilność i elastyczność artystów poskutkowała m.in. powstaniem prekariatu – ale to już temat na inną, bardzo dziś zresztą potrzebną, rozmowę.

W latach osiemdziesiątych i wczesnych dziewięćdziesiątych radykalnie zmienił się zatem charakter teatru niezależnego: nowa estetyka (zerwanie z reprezentacją), nowe struktury i hierarchie w systemie pracy, kolektywy zamiast etatowych pracowników, grupy zamiast teatrów repertuarowych. Na tym tle szczególnie istotne było pojawienie się nowych centrów sztuki, które wypracowały interdyscyplinarne programy i, w konsekwencji, przyciągnęły inną publiczność niż ta, która w ramach abonamentu wypełniała teatry repertuarowe.

W późnych latach dziewięćdziesiątych nastąpił dalszy rozwój niezależnej sceny teatralnej i tanecznej, powstawały kolejne centra sztuk performatywnych, rozrosła się także międzynarodowa działalność – m.in. poprzez eksplozję festiwali teatralnych oraz liczne sieci współpracy rozmaitych ośrodków niezależnych. Na przełomie XX i XXI wieku szczególnie wyraźnie można było dostrzec zjawisko festiwalizacji środowisk teatralnych krajów post-sowieckich, które otworzyły granice. Jednocześnie w drugiej połowie lat dziewięćdziesiątych w regionie Bałkanów rozwinęły się znakomite ośrodki intelektualne, komentujące i badające współczesne sztuki performatywne, skupione wokół dwóch magazynów: „Maska” w Lublanie i „Frakcija” w Zagrzebiu. Po 2000 roku powstawały tam również pierwsze niezależne organizacje badawcze i edukacyjne (rok 2000 – założenie Walking Theory w Belgradzie, 2005 – Nomad Dance Academy), rozwijały się również lokalne sieci współpracy (Balkan Dance Network).

Co ważne, obserwowana od ponad trzech dekad festiwalizacja życia teatralnego i tanecznego, rozwój instytucji alternatywnych wobec teatrów repertuarowych, a także centrów choreograficznych (domy produkcyjne, interdyscyplinarne ośrodki niezależne), wreszcie obecność międzynarodowych platform, sieci, laboratoriów oraz pozaakademickich ośrodków badawczych oznacza fundamentalne przemiany modelu funkcjonowania teatru w społeczeństwie oraz doskonale odzwierciedla system ekonomiczny, w jakim funkcjonuje Europa. Od lat siedemdziesiątych ubiegłego wieku jesteśmy świadkami paradygmatycznych zmian ekonomicznych, społecznych i politycznych, związanych z procesami i warunkami produkcji, nazwanych m.in. przez Michaela Hardta i Antonio Negri przejściem kapitalizmu przemysłowego w kognitywny. Gospodarka oparta na pracy materialnej ewoluowała w stronę gospodarki wiedzy, wobec czego hierarchiczne społeczeństwa przemysłowe kultury zachodniej uległy przekształceniom w sieciowe społeczeństwa poprzemysłowe. Nastąpiło przejście kapitalizmu do późnej fazy, w której najważniejszym produktem są usługi i wiedza, a o przewadze decyduje znaczenie i rozpiętość sieci posiadanych kontaktów, reputacja oraz zasięg współpracy międzynarodowej. W latach dziewięćdziesiątych model późnego kapitalizmu (w wersji „turbo” – gospodarki bezwzględnej, błyskawicznie się rozwijającej, szybko i skutecznie podporządkowującej sobie społeczeństwa postsocjalistyczne) zderzono w krajach postkomunistycznych z efektami gospodarki centralnie planowanej. Owe zmiany ekonomiczne (a za nimi – społeczne) w ciągu kilku ostatnich dekad wpłynęły zasadniczo na strategie produkcji i dystrybucji sztuki, które w dużym, często decydującym, stopniu wyznacza właśnie kurator.

 

3.

Kurator to m.in. pośrednik, tłumacz, producent, mediator, twórca, dramaturg. Partner artysty, twórca kontekstu, w jakim pokazywane są dane praktyki artystyczne lub ich efekty, odpowiedzialny za warunki pracy artystów, ich obecność na rynku międzynarodowym i lokalnym, widoczność w mediach, za kontakt z publicznością. Ważne są tutaj również kompetencje krytyczne: umiejętność nazywania konkretnych zjawisk i umieszczania ich w wybranym kontekście. Kurator jest więc także specjalistą, ekspertem – czyli postacią wyjątkowo eksponowaną w społeczeństwach poprzemysłowych.

Jednym z modeli zawodu kuratora, świetnie funkcjonującym w europejskim środowisku sztuk performatywnych, jest kurator festiwali. Zależnie od skali, budżetu i partnerów danego festiwalu, stanowisko to może się wiązać z władzą wpływania na kształt mainstreamu teatru i tańca Europy lub oferować warunki do podejmowania ryzyka i lansowania najmłodszych twórców. Z pewnością praca kuratora festiwalu daje przywilej kształtowania obszaru współczesnych sztuk performatywnych i dyskursu wokół nich zgodnie z własnymi wyborami, doświadczeniem, pasją, kaprysem. Być może dlatego ta funkcja bywa atrakcyjna dla wielu artystów.

Przykłady artystów-kuratorów, które chcę tu przywołać, dotyczą uznanych, wielokrotnie nagradzanych twórców oraz prestiżowych festiwali. Boris Charmatz został współautorem programu Festiwalu w Awinionie podczas 65. edycji, w roku 2011, Heiner Goebbels objął dyrekcję artystyczną Ruhrtriennale na lata 2012-2014, Romeo Castellucci był kuratorem programu Festiwalu Malta w roku 2013. Powyższe przykłady dotyczą dużych, bogatych festiwali międzynarodowych; Ruhrtriennale ma imponujący budżet, porównywalny tylko z największymi festiwalami operowymi, Festival d’Avignon to z kolei jeden z dwóch najstarszych (obok Edynburga) i najbardziej prestiżowych festiwali w Europie, Malta natomiast od kilku lat konsekwentnie wypracowuje sobie pozycję ważnego gracza na europejskim rynku (koprodukcje m.in. z Awinionem, świetny program zagraniczny, uczestnictwo w sieci wpływowych festiwali i ośrodków House on Fire). Każdy z festiwalowych programów tworzonych przez wymienionych wyżej artystów był wyrazisty, każdy mocno nacechowany indywidualnymi wyborami kuratorów oraz kontekstem, w jakim zdecydowali się pokazać swoją twórczość.

Boris Charmatz pracował nad programem 65. edycji Festiwalu Awinionu przez dwa lata, prowadząc rozmowy z dyrektorami: Vincent Baudrillerem i Hortense Archambault. Udało mu się wprowadzić do jednego z najbardziej mainstreamowych festiwali tych choreografów i artystów wizualnych, którzy eksperymentują z formą przedstawienia i prezentacji, którzy zastanawiają się nad relacją: artysta – widz i stawiają pytania o znaczenie przestrzeni publicznych oraz rolę i status sztuki we współczesnym społeczeństwie. Do tych problemów nawiązywały wprost Low Pieces Xaviera Le Roy oraz performans This is situation Tino Sehgala, ale również wystawa i warsztaty Jérôma Bela.

W wywiadach Charmatz zawsze podkreślał, że należy do tego pokolenia twórców,  którzy w centrum swojej pracy stawiają pytania o jej kontekst: czym właściwie jest spektakl? Jak budowana jest relacja z publicznością? Po co widzowie mają przychodzić na mój spektakl? Dla kogo i po co go robię? Co oznacza ciało na scenie? Jak moja praca odnosi się do historii tańca i do pamięci widzów? Programowanie festiwalu dało francuskiemu choreografowi możliwość pokazania tych twórców współczesnych sztuk performatywnych, których łączy (bliski także jemu samemu) sposób myślenia o tańcu. W związku z tym w programie znaleźli się rozmaici twórcy, z którymi Charmatz pracował, oraz tacy, którymi się inspiruje: Anna Teresa de Keersmaeker (m.in pokazano Rosas dans Rosas oraz Fases), Jérôme Bel, Xavier Le Roy, Tino Sehgal, Christine de Smedt, Jan Ritsema, Bojana Cvejić, Meg Stuart itd. Zaprezentowano również dwie prace Charmatza: głośne Enfant i Levée des confilts. W rezultacie powstał fascynujący przegląd współczesnego tańca krytycznego, pokazujący w szerszej perspektywie sposób kształtowania się tego nurtu tanecznego.

Co jednak szczególnie ciekawe, Charmatzowi, przedmiotem fascynacji którego jest szkoła jako instytucja publiczna, udało się uczynić z Awinionu poligon doświadczania i eksperymentalnych spotkań z tańcem. Zamienił awiniońską École d’Art w École du Festival, odwołując się wprost do swojej pracy w Rennes, gdzie w miejsce Narodowego Centrum Choreograficznego stworzył Muzeum Tańca (http://www.museedeladanse.org), oraz do swojego wieloletniego projektu nomadycznej szkoły performatywnej Bocal. W programie znalazła się również wystawa, dokumentująca obecność tańca w Awinionie od momentu powstania festiwalu, pokazująca bardzo ciekawą ścieżkę rozwoju tańca na przestrzeni ostatnich kilkudziesięciu lat z perspektywy awiniońskiej, przypominając przy tym także te przypadki, kiedy spektakle, należące w tej chwili do kanonu (np. Rosas dans Rosas), bywały w Awinionie całkowicie odrzucane.

Przy czym trzeba tu podkreślić, że pozycja artiste associé przy Festiwalu w Awinionie ma bardzo jasno zarysowane granice odpowiedzialności, co wydaje się wygodnym rozwiązaniem. Boris Charmatz był odpowiedzialny za część programu, do jego obowiązków należała też reprezentacja festiwalu w mediach (wywiady, konferencje prasowe), reszta natomiast (w tym produkcja całości) leżała w zakresie działań dwojga dyrektorów festiwalu i ich współpracowników.

Zupełnie inaczej wygląda to w przypadku Ruhrtriennale: Heiner Goebbels ma do dyspozycji znakomitego młodego menadżera Lukasa Crepaza oraz świetny zespół, ale w dalszym ciągu to on pozostaje odpowiedzialny za całość festiwalu: za jego program, budżet, frekwencję publiczności, wizerunek. Daje to, oczywiście, więcej władzy, ale wymaga znacznie więcej pracy i oznacza odpowiednio większą odpowiedzialność. Z tego powodu Goebbels na trzy lata właściwie wycofał się z innych działań; bardzo zredukował nauczanie, odmawia prowadzenia dłuższych seminariów, przerwał komponowanie. Nie zrezygnował jednak z reżyserii: każda edycja Ruhrtriennale przynosi dwa pokazy jego prac, z czego co najmniej jedna jest prapremierą (w 2012 roku: Europeas 1&2 oraz When the mountain changed its clothing, a w 2013 Delusion of the fury oraz wznowienie Stifters dinge). Dla Goebbelsa festiwal jest swego rodzaju ukoronowaniem kariery artystycznej; jak mówi sam artysta, ma wreszcie możliwość zapraszania wszystkich swoich partnerów, przyjaciół, byłych i obecnych współpracowników (Robert Wilson, Robert Lepage, Anna Teresa de Keersmaeker, Romeo Castellucci), a także artystów, którzy zachwycili go w ostatnich latach (Boris Charmatz, Boredoms, Tarek Atoui), oraz tych, których bywał nauczycielem (Rimini Protokoll). Ruhtriennale pod kierownictwem Goebbelsa to „międzynarodowy festiwal sztuk” , który jest jednocześnie manifestem estetycznych wyborów artysty: pokazem spektakli odrzucających reprezentację, psychologiczną wiarygodność i polityczną interwencyjność, prac artystów działających na przecięciu dyscyplin, eksperymentujących z formą teatralną i muzyczną. Festiwal stał się dla Goebbelsa spełnieniem marzeń o pracy z utworami takich kompozytorów, jak John Cage czy Harry Partch, oraz okazją do nazwania i pokazania tego nurtu sztuk performatywnych, który jest mu najbliższy.

Rzecz ma się jeszcze inaczej w przypadku kuratora tegorocznej edycji Festiwalu Malta. Romeo Castellucci został poproszony o programowanie idiomu Maltańskiego – tej części programu, której zakres tematyczny i kontekstowy zmienia się co roku i proponowany jest przez organizatorów. Tym razem idiomem festiwalu było zawołanie „oh man, oh machine”, problematyzujące relację człowieka z maszyną. Maszyny, stale obecne w spektaklach Castellucciego, są dla niego jednocześnie inspiracją i zagrożeniem; przedmiotem fascynacji i źródłem obsesyjnych lęków. W swoim tekście kuratorskim reżyser poszerza pole skojarzeń z pojęciem maszyny, rozciągając je na relacje społeczne, polityczne czy wreszcie na intymną mechanikę ciała. Program zaproponowany przez Romeo Castellucciego to bardzo starannie dokonany wybór artystów, pracujących zarówno w obszarze teatru i tańca (Giselle Vienne, Needcompany, Marta Górnicka) czy muzyki (Scott Gibbons), jak i przecinających dziedziny sztuk performatywnych i wizualnych (Tino Sehgal, Kurt Hentschläger). Był to chyba, jak dotąd, najlepiej (a na pewno najbardziej konsekwentnie) przygotowany program idiomu maltańskiego.

4.

Pora postawić pytanie, dlaczego właściwie pracę programową, wykonaną przez opisywanych wyżej artystów, nazwać pracą kuratorską, a nie np. dyrekcją artystyczną?

Nomenklatura rzeczywiście bywa różna: podczas dziesięcioletniej dyrekcji Vincenta Baudrillera i Hortense Archambault na Festiwalu w Awinionie funkcjonowało pojęcie artiste associé (artysta stowarzyszony), w przypadku Ruhrtriennale to wciąż Kunstlerischer Leiter, czyli po prostu dyrektor artystyczny; twórcy Festiwalu Malta natomiast, tworząc formułę idiomów, świadomie sięgnęli po pojęcie kuratora. To rozróżnienie odzwierciedla, oczywiście, funkcję i miejsce w strukturze, jakie twórcy festiwalu przewidzieli dla kuratora, rzecz jednak tak naprawdę nie w stosowanych przez organizatorów pojęciach, ale w mechanizmach tworzenia współczesnych sztuk performatywnych, w tym przypadku festiwali.

Z jednej strony praca kuratora ma przecież wiele cech dyrektora artystycznego (kierowanie  festiwalem, podejmowanie decyzji programowych, uważna obserwacja, nazywanie i pokazywanie najnowszych zjawisk, konfrontowanie ich z historią teatru i tańca, nadawanie kształtu całości wydarzenia, kierowanie pracą zespołu i czuwanie nad realizacją założeń programowych), z drugiej – łączy kompetencje producenta i dramaturga (podstawowym zadaniem kuratora festiwalu nie jest przecież tylko wskazanie na interesujące go zjawiska, ale też zbudowanie wokół nich kontekstu i umiejętność ciekawego, inspirującego zestawiania rozmaitych wydarzeń, zjawisk, kierunków).

Kuratorzy to elokwentni pisarze, nieustraszeni badacze, komunikatywni wychowawcy artystyczni, łatwo adaptujący się interpretatorzy, wyrafinowani krytycy, dumni redaktorzy, skrupulatni i dokładni archiwiści, pełni wyobraźni producenci, społecznie świadomi politycy, twardzi i drobiazgowi finansiści, ludzie o międzynarodowych kontaktach, wrażliwi dyplomaci, sprytni prawnicy, elastyczni kierownicy projektów i stymulujący agitatorzy (Jaschke, 2012, s. 148).

Ten opis pracy kuratora, zaproponowany przez Beatrice Jeschke, trafnie wylicza umiejętności niezbędne w tym zawodzie (i nieraz trudne do pogodzenia), a jednak nie jest wystarczający. Kuratorem nazywam bowiem pracownika kultury o określonych kompetencjach, działającego w określonym systemie ekonomicznym i społecznym, silnie determinującym jego działania, sprowadzając go przy tym niejednokrotnie do roli swego produktu.

Nieprzypadkowo zawód kuratora tzw. niezależnego (a więc nie związanego na stałe z żadną instytucją, pracującego od projektu do projektu) zaczął rozwijać się na przełomie lat sześćdziesiątych i siedemdziesiątych (w sztukach performatywnych dekadę później), równolegle z ewolucją modelu pracy w post-Fordowski i z kształtowaniem się późnej fazy kapitalizmu. Podstawą pracy niematerialnej jest generowanie komunikacji, tworzenie sieciowych struktur wymiany informacji, produkcja wiedzy. Kurator działa w systemie sieciowym, nie hierarchicznym; co nie oznacza, że jego władza jest słabsza – inaczej jednak rozkładają się kierunki jej oddziaływania. Figura tzw. kuratora niezależnego jest emblematyczna dla miasta projektowego – pojęcia zaproponowanego przez Luca Boltanskiego i Ḕve Chiapello i konstytutywnego dla definicji późnej fazy kapitalizmu. Ekonomia i relacje społeczne w mieście projektowym oparte są na nawiązywaniu kontaktów, budowaniu sieci relacji i mediacji; działania przebiegają w trybie projektowym, a więc są z założenia czasowe; nawet w projekcie wieloletnim znany jest termin jego zakończenia. Istotna jest tutaj ciągła gotowość i dostępność, otwarcie na nowe pomysły, kontakty, ponieważ to one owocują nowymi projektami. Umiejętność nawiązywania jak najliczniejszych kontaktów, ale zarazem precyzyjnego wybierania tych najcenniejszych, zdolność do wychwytywania informacji i intuicyjnego wyczuwania kierunków działań, nieustanne zaangażowanie (nie wystarczą świetne kwalifikacje, podstawą jest pełne osobiste zaangażowanie, pasja), entuzjazm, mobilność, ale też umiejętność zaznaczenia własnej autonomii i obrony dokonanych wyborów, wiedza w danej dziedzinie, umożliwiająca zajęcie pozycji eksperta i konsultanta – to najważniejsze cechy pracownika miasta projektowego. Jeżeli pracą podstawową dla produkcji w kapitalizmie kognitywnym jest praca niematerialna, opierająca się przede wszystkim na produkcji wiedzy, generowaniu komunikacji, tworzeniu sieci i przemieszczaniu się, to przecież cały współczesny przemysł festiwalowy jest tym zasadom podporządkowany.

Co ciekawe, jak piszą Boltanski i Chiapello w The New Spirit of Capitalism, hasła europejskiej rewolty studenckiej roku 1968 zostały w dużej mierze przyswojone przez język modelu pracy niematerialnej, stając się podstawą zasad działania pracy w systemie kapitalizmu kognitywnego (m.in. wyobraźnia, kreatywność, przyjemność). Przecież praca kuratora, podróżującego od festiwalu do festiwalu, to realizacja najbardziej utopijnych postulatów, to sama przyjemność, możliwość realizacji pasji, podróże, poznawanie nowych ludzi, nawiązywanie kontaktów, relacji, budowanie własnej sieci powiązań – słowem: nieustanne wakacje, prawda? To nie przypadek, że rozróżnienie życia prywatnego i zawodowego w przypadku pracy kuratora jest właściwie niemożliwe; w późnym kapitalizmie, w ekonomii zarządzanej reputacją nie istnieje coś takiego jak podział na pracę i czas wolny. Wiedza, którą wytwarzamy, nie powstanie bez swobodnego przepływu informacji, idei, rozmów; bez tego, co tak chętnie nazywamy działaniem kreatywnym i tego, co Kuba Szreder w eseju Cruel economy of authorship (Szreder, 2013) nazywa labor of love – wsparcia emocjonalnego, pasji, wymiany inspiracji etc. Wytwarzany produkt jest tak ściśle związany z kompetencjami osobistymi, z indywidualnym potencjałem emocjonalnym, z doświadczeniem, że sens terminów „zawodowy” i „prywatny” staje się tutaj nieuchwytny. Kapitalizm kognitywny opiera się na produkcji wiedzy; produkcja wiedzy jest natomiast ściśle związana z indywidualnymi predyspozycjami. Szreder wskazuje na to, że sukces producenta kultury w tym systemie zależy od jego sprawności poruszania się w rozmaitych kontekstach, biegłości w nawiązywaniu kontaktów, umiejętności przeprowadzania właściwych połączeń, wychwytywaniu good ideas i umiejętnym sterowaniu procesem ich publikacji; jego sukces w znacznej mierze sprowadza się zatem nie do procesu pracy, ale do umiejętności wychwycenia i opublikowania ciekawego zjawiska. Przykład: najbardziej cenieni są ci kuratorzy, którzy nie tylko umiejętnie poruszają się w sieciach współpracy i rozmaitych relacjach powiązań między artystami, producentami i mediami, ale przede wszystkim odznaczają się niezwykłą intuicją, tacy, którzy pierwsi wynajdą ciekawego artystę, ogłoszą go nową „gwiazdą”, nazwą jego pracę i wprowadzą w światowy obieg. Przy czym umiejętność wynajdywania nowych trendów, zjawisk, kierunków – to jedno, ale równie ważna jest zdolność nazwania, opublikowania i dystrybuowania oraz promocji danego zjawiska/dzieła/artysty. Rozmowy kuratorów opierają się na relacjach osobistych, kluczowe jest tu nawet nie to, ile pieniędzy za tobą stoi, tylko co masz do powiedzenia o spektaklu, który właśnie zobaczyłeś, to, czy twoja pasja jest szczera, czy twoje wybory, rekomendacje, propozycje budzą zaufanie. Wiarygodność kuratora budowana jest zatem w równym stopniu przez jego kompetencje zawodowe, jak i predyspozycje osobiste.

Co sprawia, że ten zawód bywa atrakcyjny dla artystów? Przede wszystkim wyposaża ich on w narzędzia władzy niedostępne inną drogą – to twórcy najważniejszych festiwali decydują o kształcie mainstreamu sztuk performatywnych w Europie. Artysta-kurator buduje swoją pozycję nie tylko na podstawie własnej praktyki artystycznej, ale również poprzez możliwość produkcji i dystrybucji prac innych twórców. Ma również przywilej nazywania, ogłaszania i promowania tych zjawisk artystycznych, które są mu najbliższe.

5. 

Jestem przeciwna tendencjom szukania w zjawisku kuratorstwa zmiany paradygmatu tworzenia i odbioru kultury; uważam, że jeszcze za wcześnie, by proklamować „zwrot kuratorski”, chociaż obecność tego zawodu ma niewątpliwy wpływ na proces produkcji sztuki. Dodatkowo pojęcie kuratorstwa (curating) i kuratorskości (curatorial) bywa wykorzystywane jako legitymizacja zawodu przez samych kuratorów oraz jako metoda autodefinicji i uprawomocniania własnej, rosnącej władzy w świecie sztuki. Jednak dyskurs rozwijający się wokół zawodu kuratora może być ciekawą i inspirującą propozycją dla sztuk performatywnych, dawać szanę na analizę ich statusu w społeczeństwie, umożliwiającą m.in. krytyczne spojrzenie na system ich produkcji. Prześledzenie pracy artysty jako kuratora może posłużyć przyjrzeniu się sposobowi działania systemu produkcji sztuki i obnażeniu rozmaitych mechanizmów, których jesteśmy efektem bądź produktem.

Okaże się wtedy bardzo szybko, że zawód kuratora niepokojąco dobrze wpisuje się w założenia stojące u podstaw pracy niematerialnej, konstytuującej późną fazę kapitalizmu. Kurator jest owocem tego systemu ekonomicznego, uosabiając najważniejsze jego zasady i mechanizmy (tworzenie sieciowych relacji wpływu i władzy, zrównanie życia zawodowego z prywatnym, samo-zatrudnienie i samo-eksploatacja), stając się jednocześnie narzędziem legitymizującym je i utrwalającym. Jego pozycja jest zatem ambiwaletna, wymaga ciągłej czujności i krytycznej obserwacji. Nie bez powodu w sztukach wizualnych od lat artyści wyraźnie krytykują pozycję kuratorów – niejasny mechanizm redystrybucji władzy, nieprzejrzyste reguły włączania jednych artystów w obieg i wykluczania z niego innych, wreszcie konflikt na poziomie autorstwa (np. kto jest autorem wystawy: kurator? artysta? widz?) powodują napięcia i konflikty oraz budzą całkowicie zrozumiały sprzeciw artystów. Świetnie pisze o tym Rabih Mroué, libański performer i reżyser: „[…] moja wiedza o kuratorach ukształtowana jest przez moją rolę jako artysty w relacji z kuratorem. Jeśli chodzi o to, co dzieje się przed rozpoczęciem pracy i po jej zakończeniu, wydaje mi się, że artyści nie próbują zrozumieć, jak to działa. Tak, jakby nas to nie dotyczyło.”. Mroué pisze o pytaniach, na które nie zna odpowiedzi, chociaż jest świadom, że dotyczą one zasad funkcjonowania mechanizmu, którego on sam jest częścią: jak kuratorzy zdobywają środki na projekty? Jak je zabezpieczają i co muszą zaoferować w zamian? Na jakiej podstawie sponsorzy i fundatorzy godzą się finansować wydarzenia artystyczne? Na jakiej płaszczyźnie kuratorzy znajdują z nimi wspólny język i negocjują warunki? W jaki sposób projekty są rozliczane, co kuratorzy muszą udowodnić, przedstawić fundatorom i sponsorom? Co stoi za strategicznymi decyzjami wyboru tego akurat regionu lub tego akurat tematu jako wiodącego w danym momencie? Dlaczego ci sami artyści jednego dnia zapraszani są wszędzie, a kiedy indziej kompletnie zapominani? Co w tym systemie odgrywa większą rolę: polityka, ideologie, kultura, propaganda, strategie marketingowe czy wszystko naraz? Kto ma większą władzę i większy wpływ na decyzje: donatorzy czy kuratorzy? Mroué dodaje:

Wydaje mi się, że kuratorzy stoją na bardzo niepewnym gruncie, rozpiętym między władzą a sztuką […] W tej chwili mogę jedynie powiedzieć, że jestem ignorantem przynajmniej w dwóch-trzecich tematu. To, co wiem, to pewność, że artysta powienien dowiedzieć się więcej i tego potrzebuje; powinien być włączony w proces pracy i być za niego odpowiedzialny, zostawiając pretensjonalną ingnorancję daleko za sobą (Mroué, 2010, s. 88.)

Historia zawodu kuratora pokazuje również, że w tak działającym systemie największe szanse mają ci, którzy najszybciej i najsprawniej potrafią wyłowić, nazwać i wypromować dane zjawisko, artystę, kierunek. Nie zawsze zatem najważniejszy jest proces pracy, ale jej efekt – i to, kto o nim mówi. Może się zatem okazać i tak, że o sukcesie w tej dziedzinie decydują nie tyle (a na pewno nie tylko) kompetencje oraz doświadczenie, ile umiejętność atrakcyjnego ich opakowania. Z drugiej strony, świadomość istniejących warunków produkcji oraz posiadanych narzędzi ciągle daje właśnie kuratorom szansę przeprowadzenia rzetelnej krytyki systemu – choćby przez pokazanie procesu, rezygnację z efektu, przewartościowanie czasu produkcji, trwania performansu, czasu percepcji.

 

Bibliografia:

Beatrice von Bismarck, Cultures of the curatorial, red. Beatrice von Bismarck, Jörn Schafaff, Thomas Weski, Sternberg Press, Berlin 2012.

Beatrice Jaschke, Kuratorstwo. Zawód w stanie przejściowym, przeł. Karolina Kolenda, [w:] Rozmawiając o wystawie, red. Maria Hussakowska, Kraków 2012, http://www.worldofart.org/aktualno/wp-content/publikacije/Talking-about-Exhibition.pdf, dostęp: 21 I 2014.

Rabih Mroué, At Least One-third of the Subject, „Frakcija”, 2010 nr 55, „Curating Performing Arts”. Periodyk wydaje Centre for Drama Art & Academy of Drama Art, Zagrzeb, Chorwacja.

Simon Sheikh, Representation, Contestation and Power: The Artist as Public Intellectual, „republicart” 2004, http://republicart.net/disc/aap/sheikh02_en.htm, dostęp: 21 I 2014.

Kuba Szreder, Cruel economy of authorship, [w:] Undoing property, red. Marysia Lewandowska i Laurel Ptak, Sterberg Press, Berlin 2013.

This curator-producer-dramaturge-whatever figure, rozmowa z Gabriele Brandstetter, Hannah Hurtzig, Virve Sutinen oraz Hilde Teuchies, „Frakcija” 2010 nr 55

 

Tekst został opublikowany w „Didaskaliach” nr 121/122

 


Dodaj komentarz

“Uważasz się za przepracowanego czy nie dość zajętego?”. Kurator jako producent kultury wobec systemu produkcji sztuki

Przy okazji rozwoju dyskursu wokół praktyki kuratorskiej kilku badaczy i praktyków proklamowało zwrot kuratorski (“curatorial turn”) – m.in. Beatrice von Bismarck w swojej książce “Cultures of the Curatorial”: kolejny (po m.in. performative turn, educational turn, mnemonic turn etc.) zwrot w humanistyce, który ma ukazywać paradygmatyczne zmiany w procesie tworzenia i odbioru kultury. Mam jednak wiele wątpliwości odnośnie zasadności obwieszczania nastania kolejnego nowego paradygmatu: uważam, że mamy tu raczej do czynienia z fascynującym procesem odsłaniania reguł produkcji i dystrybucji sztuki, z opisem i problematyzacją pewnych praktyk, pokazujących kontekst ekonomiczny i społeczny aktywności artystycznej. Obecność kuratora nie oznacza jednak w mojej opinii paradygmatycznej zmiany w sztuce i humanistyce; jest raczej efektem przemian społecznych, politycznych i ekonomicznych, jakie obserwujemy w Europie tzw. Zachodniej od mniej więcej lat 80., w krajach postkomunistycznych – od lat 90. Dodatkowo hasło tzw. “curatorial turn” bywa wykorzystywane przez samych kuratorów jako próba legitymizacji własnego zawodu; staje się metodą autodefinicji i wzmacniania rozwoju “przemysłu kuratorskiego”. Zwróćmy uwagę, że autorzy poszczególnych publikacji książkowych, esejów, tekstów konferencyjnych zawodowo zajmują się kuratorstwem, ryzyko wykorzystania zatem rozwijanego dyskursu do własnych celów i do uprawomocniania własnej, rosnącej władzy w świecie sztuki jest bardzo wysokie. Również rezultat wprowadzenia kuratorstwa na uczelnie jest ambiwalentny: z jednej strony akademicka instytucjonalizacja oznacza bowiem ugruntowanie tego zawodu i jego oficjalną legitymizację, z drugiej – poprzez “profesjonalizację” osłabia jego potencjał krytyczny. W strukturach akademickich kuratorzy stali się kolejnymi producentami wiedzy, doskonale wpisując się w ramy panującego systemu ekonomicznego i ustanawiając nowe relacje władzy.

Moja perspektywa oczywiście również nie jest wolna od tych ambiwalencji, a już na pewno nie jest w żadnym sensie “obiektywna” czy przezroczysta. Jestem aktywną zawodowo kuratorką w obszarze teatru i tańca, prowadzę m.in. festiwal Konfrontacje w Lublinie i międzynarodowy projekt Wschodnioeuropejskiej Platformy Sztuk Performatywnych (EEPAP); dodatkowo przygotowuję doktorat o kuratorstwie w sztukach performatywnych, a więc potencjalnie kolejną publikację rozwijającą dyskurs wokół praktyki kuratorskiej. Tekst ten jest zatem próbą (ryzykowną) autokrytycznej obserwacji własnej praktyki zawodowej i zbadania kontekstu, który ją kształtuje.

Przyglądam się praktyce kuratorskiej z perspektywy lokalnej, z punktu widzenia kraju postkomunistycznego, w którym dominujący jest system miejskich, wojewódzkich i państwowych teatrów repertuarowych – instytucji hierarchicznych, z bardzo zawiłą i zastaną strukturą oraz niejednokrotnie przemocowym (opartym na niepodzielnej władzy dyrektora) systemem zarządzania. Zatem pojawienie się kuratorów tzw. “niezależnych” w polskim teatrze i tańcu niesie tak wiele ryzyka, jak i szans: może otworzyć możliwości przeformułowania dyskursu wokół instytucji sztuk performatywnych i modelu produkcji sztuki, może też jednak sprowadzić system produkcji teatralnej i tanecznej do działania projektowego, efemerycznego, charakteryzującego się nadmiarem produkcji i niedostatkiem czasu na pracę, a w dodatku zależnego od politycznych decyzji grantowych i de facto spełniającego zadania przez polityków właśnie wyznaczone.

W tym kontekście zajmują mnie szczególnie dwa pytania:

  1. kim jest dzisiaj kurator jako producent kultury? w jakim kontekście społecznym, politycznym i ekonomicznym pracuje?
  2. jak w przypadku silnego uwikłania kuratorstwa w system ekonomiczny i społeczny możliwa jest postawa krytyczna, subwersywna, przyjmowana wewnątrz instytucji?

 

Za pytaniem kim jest dzisiaj kurator (a także artysta, intelektualista, badacz) jako producent kultury podążają następne: jakie są modele jego pracy i jak zmieniła się ich rola w kapitalizmie kognitywnym, opartym na produkcji wiedzy i na afekcie? kim jest producent kultury (cultural producer), jakie są warunki jego działań, jakie metody podejmowania decyzji, wyborów i jak one z kolei wpływają na obieg sztuki? jak wygląda współczesny system produkcji sztuki? jakie rządzą nim zasady, kto decyduje o wyborze danego artysty i publikacji jego pracy? kto włącza jednych w międzynarodowy obieg festiwalowy, by innych na długo z niego wykluczyć? To nie są pytania zawieszone w próżni: dotyczą rozmaitych sieci zależności, relacji, powiązań twórców, producentów i odbiorców, które zasadniczo wpływają na przestrzeń współczesnego teatru i tańca.

“Kuratorzy to elokwentni pisarze, nieustraszeni badacze, komunikatywni wychowawcy artystyczni, łatwo adaptujący się interpretatorzy, wyrafinowani krytycy, dumni redaktorzy, skrupulatni i dokładni archiwiści, pełni wyobraźni producenci, społecznie świadomi politycy, twardzi i drobiazgowi finansiści, ludzie o międzynarodowych kontaktach, wrażliwi dyplomaci, sprytni prawnicy, elastyczni kierownicy projektów i stymulujący agitatorzy” (Jaschke, 2012, s. 148).

Ten opis pracy kuratora, nieco ironicznie zaproponowany przez Beatrice Jeschke, trafnie wylicza umiejętności niezbędne w tym zawodzie (i nieraz trudne do pogodzenia), a jednak nie jest wystarczający. Kuratorem nazywam bowiem przede wszystkim producenta kultury o określonych kompetencjach, działającego w określonym systemie ekonomicznym i społecznym, silnie determinującym jego działania, sprowadzając go przy tym niejednokrotnie do roli swego produktu. Nieprzypadkowo zawód kuratora tzw. niezależnego (a więc nie związanego na stałe z żadną instytucją, pracującego od projektu do projektu) zaczął rozwijać się na przełomie lat sześćdziesiątych i siedemdziesiątych (w sztukach performatywnych dekadę później), równolegle z ewolucją modelu pracy późno-kapitalistyczny (czy, za Rebeką Schneider, “późno-późno” kapitalistyczny) i z kształtowaniem się późnej fazy kapitalizmu. Podstawą pracy niematerialnej jest generowanie komunikacji, tworzenie sieciowych struktur wymiany informacji, produkcja wiedzy. Kurator działa w dwóch systemach: hierarchicznym i sieciowym; co nie oznacza, że jego władza jest rozproszona – inaczej rozkładają się kierunki jej oddziaływania. Praktyka kuratorska jest w znacznym stopniu owocem późnego kapitalizmu, uosabiając jego zasady i mechanizmy (najważniejszym produktem są usługi i wiedza, a o przewadze decyduje znaczenie i rozpiętość sieci posiadanych kontaktów, reputacja oraz zasięg współpracy międzynarodowej), stając się jednocześnie narzędziem legitymizującym je i utrwalającym. Jego pozycja jest zatem ambiwaletna, wymaga ciągłej czujności i krytycznej obserwacji. Nie bez powodu w sztukach wizualnych od lat artyści krytykują pozycję kuratorów – niejasny mechanizm redystrybucji władzy, nieprzejrzyste reguły włączania jednych artystów w obieg i wykluczania z niego innych, wreszcie konflikt na poziomie autorstwa (np. kto jest autorem festiwalu: kurator? artysta? widz?) powodują napięcia i konflikty oraz budzą całkowicie zrozumiały sprzeciw artystów.

Co więcej, figura tzw. kuratora niezależnego jest emblematyczna dla miasta projektowego – pojęcia zaproponowanego przez Luca Boltanskiego i Ḕve Chiapello i konstytutywnego dla definicji późnej fazy kapitalizmu. Ekonomia i relacje społeczne w mieście projektowym oparte są na nawiązywaniu kontaktów, budowaniu sieci relacji i mediacji; działania przebiegają w trybie projektowym, a więc są z założenia czasowe; nawet w projekcie wieloletnim znany jest termin jego zakończenia. Istotna jest tutaj ciągła gotowość i dostępność, otwarcie na nowe pomysły, kontakty, ponieważ to one owocują nowymi projektami. Umiejętność nawiązywania jak najbardziej licznych kontaktów, ale zarazem precyzyjnego wybierania tych najcenniejszych, zdolność do wychwytywania informacji i intuicyjnego wyczuwania kierunków działań, nieustanne zaangażowanie (nie wystarczą świetne kwalifikacje, podstawą jest pełne osobiste zaangażowanie, pasja), entuzjazm, mobilność, ale też umiejętność zaznaczenia własnej autonomii i obrony dokonanych wyborów, wiedza w danej dziedzinie, umożliwiająca zajęcie pozycji eksperta i konsultanta – to najważniejsze cechy pracownika miasta projektowego. Jeżeli pracą podstawową dla produkcji w kapitalizmie kognitywnym jest praca niematerialna, opierająca się przede wszystkim na produkcji wiedzy, generowaniu komunikacji, tworzeniu sieci i przemieszczaniu się, to przecież cały współczesny przemysł festiwalowy jest tym zasadom podporządkowany.

Co ciekawe, jak piszą Boltanski i Chiapello w The New Spirit of Capitalism, hasła europejskiej rewolty studenckiej roku 1968, takie, jak m.in. wyobraźnia, kreatywność, przyjemność, zostały w dużej mierze przyswojone przez język modelu pracy niematerialnej, stając się podstawą zasad działania pracy w systemie kapitalizmu kognitywnego. Przecież praca kuratora, podróżującego od festiwalu do festiwalu, to realizacja najbardziej postulatów, to sama przyjemność, możliwość realizacji pasji, podróże, poznawanie nowych ludzi, nawiązywanie kontaktów, relacji, budowanie własnej sieci powiązań – słowem: nieustanne wakacje, prawda? To nie przypadek, że rozróżnienie życia prywatnego i zawodowego w przypadku pracy kuratora jest właściwie niemożliwe; w późnym kapitalizmie, w ekonomii zarządzanej reputacją nie istnieje coś takiego jak podział na pracę i czas wolny. Wiedza, którą wytwarzamy, nie powstanie bez swobodnego przepływu informacji, idei, rozmów; bez tego, co tak chętnie nazywamy działaniem kreatywnym i tego, co Michael Hardt określa pracą kreatywną, a Kuba Szreder używa w eseju Cruel economy of authorship (Szreder, 2013) pojęcia labor of love: bez wymiany emocji, inspiracji etc.Wytwarzany produkt jest tak ściśle związany z kompetencjami osobistymi, z indywidualnym potencjałem emocjonalnym, z doświadczeniem, że sens terminów „zawodowy” i „prywatny” staje się tutaj nieuchwytny. Kapitalizm kognitywny opiera się na produkcji wiedzy, emocji i przywiązania; co jest związane ściśle z indywidualnymi predyspozycjami. Szreder wskazuje na to, że sukces producenta kultury w tym systemie zależy od jego sprawności poruszania się w rozmaitych kontekstach, biegłości w nawiązywaniu kontaktów, umiejętności przeprowadzania właściwych połączeń, wychwytywaniu good ideas i umiejętnym sterowaniu procesem ich publikacji; jego sukces w znacznej mierze sprowadza się zatem nie do procesu pracy, ale do umiejętności wychwycenia i opublikowania ciekawego zjawiska. Przykład: najbardziej cenieni są ci kuratorzy, którzy nie tylko umiejętnie poruszają się w sieciach współpracy i rozmaitych relacjach powiązań między artystami, producentami i mediami, ale przede wszystkim odznaczają się niezwykłą intuicją, tacy, którzy pierwsi wynajdą ciekawego artystę, ogłoszą go nową „gwiazdą”, nazwą jego pracę i wprowadzą w światowy obieg. Przy czym umiejętność wynajdywania nowych trendów, zjawisk, kierunków – to jedno, ale równie ważna jest zdolność nazwania, opublikowania i dystrybuowania oraz promocji danego zjawiska/dzieła/artysty. Rozmowy kuratorów opierają się na relacjach osobistych, kluczowe jest tu nawet nie to, ile pieniędzy za tobą stoi, tylko co masz do powiedzenia o spektaklu, który właśnie zobaczyłeś, to, czy twoja pasja jest szczera, czy twoje wybory, rekomendacje, propozycje budzą zaufanie. Wiarygodność kuratora budowana jest zatem w równym stopniu przez jego kompetencje zawodowe, jak i predyspozycje osobiste.

Badanie kuratorstwa (a więc zarówno zawodu kuratora, jak i praktyk kuratorskich oraz zjawiska nazywanego przez m.in. Beatrice von Bismarck i Irit Rogoff mianem  “kuratorskości” – “the curatorial”) umożliwia zatem odsłonięcie reguł rządzących produkcją i dystrybucją współczesnej sztuki (a więc na szerszym planie dotykamy tutaj problemu dystrybucji kapitału kulturowego) oraz przyjrzenie się mechanizmom wyboru, prezentacji i oceny towarzyszącym praktyce artystycznej. Pokazuje, że obecność artysty w obiegu sztuki nie jest jedynie wynikiem talentu, przypadku, szczęścia, ale zależy także od decyzji osób odpowiedzialnych za kształtowanie obiegu oraz za budowanie relacji z publicznością: producentów kultury.

Proces ten nie jest jednak transparentny, brak w nim jasnych reguł i obiektywnych kryteriów; praca kuratora w znacznym stopniu oparta jest na afekcie, osobistych wyborach, kompetencjach, bardzo zależna jest zatem od osobowości poszczególnych jednostek odpowiedzialnych za pracę kuratorską – oraz od ich osobistego zaangażowania i indywidualnych predyspozycji. Co jest w pewnym stopniu konsekwencją rozwoju sztuki współczesnej: jej wartości nie sposób zmierzyć jakimikolwiek istniejącymi czy, jeszcze lepiej, obiektywnymi kryteriami; prace współczesnych artystów wymykają się wszelako pojętym zasadom, schematom, regułom, oddając odbiór i ocenę intuicji oraz indywidualnym kompetencjom widzów. Pomiędzy nimi staje jednak kurator, który jawi się w tym kontekście trochę jak instruktor procesu, którego nie da się nauczyć; tłumacz nieprzekładalnego, odpowiedzialny za nakładanie kontekstualnych ram: czasem otwierających nowe kierunki odbioru wobec rozmaitych prac artystycznych, innym razem zawężający je do jednej wybranej perspektywy. Czy to oznacza, że wartość sztuki, zawsze niemierzalna, zaczęła poddawać się procesom kuratorskim? Jest “kuratorowana”? Czy to oznacza demokratyzację czy jednak do pewnego stopnia prywatyzację reguł sztuki?

Jestem przekonana, że świadoma obserwacja sieci wzajemnych zależności, które tworzą i otaczają system produkcji sztuki jest podstawą dla krytycznego myślenia o współczesnym teatrze i tańcu oraz punktem wyjścia dla artystów, którym bliska jest perspektywa krytyczna. Pytanie brzmi, jak w sytuacji tak ścisłych powiązań między modelem ekonomicznym a produkcją sztuki możemy dziś zajmować pozycje krytyczne wobec systemu? W jaki sposób możliwe jest wyjście poza jego ramy tak, by nie oznaczało to społecznego samobójstwa i blokady dalszej pracy; jak wreszcie nie dać się uwieść złudzeniu, że wystarczy napisać krytyczny tekst i już, zrobione?

Spośród dwóch możliwych sposobów przyjmowania krytycznej postawy wobec instytucji (pierwszy polegałby na frontalnym ataku na istniejące instytucje, zakładanie nowych, aktywną walkę o dobro wspólne przeciw systemowi neoliberalnemu; drugi na intelektualnym krytykowaniu systemu z wewnątrz instytucji poprzez dostępne i powszechnie przyjęte środki: kolejne artykuły, rozmowy, wywiady) Fred Moten i Stefano Harney w swoim w słynnym manifeście “The University and the Undercomons” wybierają trzeci: stałe i radykalne zmiany wewnątrz instytucji, które oznaczają problematyzowanie istniejących struktur oraz podmiotowości i wywracanie ich do góry nogami: to, co wydaje się oczywiste, przestaje takim być; ramy instytucji mają być poddane wątpliwościom i przemyślane na nowo. Autorzy “Undercommons” piszą, że przyjmowanie krytycznej postawy w ramach instytucji przy użyciu zastanych środków i zachowaniu istniejącej struktury niesie za sobą ryzyko jej legitymizacji: bycie krytycznym akademikiem oznacza wzmacnianie, utwierdzanie ram instytucji.

Czy w tym kontekście możliwe jest wyobrażenie nie tylko artysty, ale również kuratora-trouble-makera, trickstera? Jak możliwe w tych warunkach uprawianie realnej krytyki instytucji? Być może chodzi o perspektywę krytyczną wobec własnej pracy, o jej nieustanne problematyzowanie, o to, że podczas przesłuchań w spektaklu “The Curators’ Piece” pozwalasz sobie na odpowiedzi: nie wiem, próbuję, zastanawiam się, szukam, nie mam pewności, a w konsekwencji narażasz się na odrzucenie nie tylko przez publiczność, ale i własną instytucję. Może zatem chodziłoby na początek o rezygnację ze sprawowania władzy na rzecz języka dialogu – nawet jeśli ryzykujemy bolesne rozbicie głów o kolejną utopię.

 

 

Bibliografia:

Luc Boltanski, Eve Chiapello, “The new spirit od capitalism”, London/New York 2005

Michael Hardt, Praca afektywna, „Kultura współczesna” 3/2012, przeł. Piotr Juskowiak i Krystian Szadkowski, (Praktyka Teoretyczna)

Beatrice Jeschke, Kuratorstwo. Zawód w stanie przejściowym, w: Maria Hussakowska (red.), “Rozmawiając o wystawie”, Kraków 2012

Maurizio Lazzarato, Praca niematerialna, w: „Robotnicy opuszczają miejsca pracy”, Łódź, 2010

Christian Marazzi, „The Violence of Financial Capitalism”, Semiotext(e), 2010

Fred Moten and Stefano Harney, “The Undercommons. Fugitive Planning and Black Study”, 2013

Irit Rogoff, Beatrice von Bismarck, Curating/Curatorial, w: Beatrice von Bismarck, Jörn Scaafaff, Thomas Weski, red, “Cultures of the Curatorial,” Berlin 2012

Kuba Szreder, Cruel economy of authorship, w: Marysia Lewandowska, Laurel Ptak (red.), “Undoing Property?”,  Berlin 2013


Dodaj komentarz

„Would you consider yourself too busy or not busy enough?”.  The curatorial turn as a self-definition and legitimacy of the curatorial industry. Is there a way out?

In the course of the development of the discourse on the curatorial praxis, a number of researchers and practitioners asserted the emergence of the “curatorial turn”. Among others, in her Cultures of the Curatorial, Beatrice von Bismarck analyses yet another turn (after, the performative turn, the educational turn, the mnemonic turn, etc.) in the humanities and in the arts that is believed to bring into sharp focus the paradigmatic changes that the dual process of creation and reception of culture has been significantly affected by in recent years. Personally, I am racked with a plethora of doubts regarding the grounds for proclaiming the reign of the above-mentioned, allegedly new paradigm; I sincerely believe that instead we are privy to a fascinating process of revealing the rules, laws, and orders of art production and distribution. Furthermore, what ensues is heightened description, critique, and problematisation of certain practices, which programmatically zoom in on the economic and social contexts of art and art-related activities. To my mind, the presence of a curator does not, however, mean that the proclaimed paradigmatic shift in the humanities and in the arts has indeed taken place. The turn is the direct product of widespread social, political, and economic changes that we have been witnessing (and participating in) since the mid-1980s in the so-called Western Europe, and since the 1990s in the post-communist countries. Additionally, the banner of the supposed “curatorial turn” is hoisted and wielded by the curators themselves as an ensign of their credibility and a tool of professional legitimization; the term provides thus a means of self-definition and gives boost to the development of the “curatorial business”. Let us carefully and cautiously consider the fact that the authors of particular volumes of essays, conference proceedings, monographs, and dissertations, are industry professionals, working in the field of curating (i.e. their interests are vested and interlocked), which in turn poses a potential double risk of further complicity and appropriation of the nascent discourse as an instrument of power, employed for self-gain, fashioned to legitimate one’s growing authority. Correspondingly, the outcome of introducing “Curatorial Studies” as part of an academic curriculum is comparable to a double-edged sword, the all-time king of ambivalence: likely to be, at best, unwieldy and, at worst, an accident waiting to happen. On the one hand, university institutionalisation is a benchmark of quality, providing academic grounding and sound official legitimization. On the other hand, this legal seal of approval – on its own a yet another marker of professionalization – diminishes the critical dimension of curatorship. Since its inception, curatorship has been informed by a foregrounded critical perspective, a novel means of thinking about exhibitions, museums, and showcasing, as pioneered by among others Harald Szeemann. In contrast, in the context of the academia, curators have been transformed into a cookie-cutter batch of producers and suppliers of knowledge (or rather know-how), being seamlessly transplanted onto the framework of the hegemonic economic system.

My critical output is undoubtedly fraught with all the above-mentioned ambivalence and tension. It is neither, for lack of a more-fitting term, “objective” nor transparent. I am a curator, actively involved in the domains of theatre and dance; I curate and programme a theatre festival and run an international arts platform project; additionally, I am working on a PhD dissertation on performing arts curatorship, which (I hope) will significantly contribute to the development of the discourse on curatorial praxis. The present paper is thus an attempt, quite a risky attempt and an uphill struggle, mind you, to self-reflexively critique my own professional praxis as well as to investigate and research the context that both underpins and determines it. To efficiently analyse curatorial praxis and simultaneously to be in synch with its diverse manifestations, I use various vantage points. However, my curatorial optics is local, rooted in a post-communist country, which is dominated (and often domineered) by a nexus of municipal and voivodeship (regional), in effect state-funded, repertory theatres. Hierarchical, with an outdated, rigidified, and mind-numbingly complex structures, they are frequently contingent upon a system of strong-arm management, the footing for which is secured by the hegemony of a one-man-army theatre director. Therefore, the emergence of freelance curators, the so-called “independent” curators, in Polish theatre and dance has led to a proliferation of both risk and opportunities. Should opportune circumstances arise, this may lead to the re-formulation of the discourse developed around performing arts and to the re-constitution of the art production model.

Seen in this context, what concerns me the most are the following questions:

  1. Who is a curator nowadays as a cultural producer? What is the social, political, and economic context of her work?
  2. How, in the case of the strong entanglement of curatorship in the socio-economic system, is it possible for the critical and subversive stance to be maintained by and within institutions?

 

The question regarding the definition (identity and positionality) of a present-day curator (but also of an artist, intellectual or researcher) as a cultural producer immediately spawns a host of other queries, following suit the original one: what are the models of a curator’s work and how has their role changed in cognitive capitalism that is based on the production of knowledge? Who constitutes a cultural producer? What are the conditions pertaining to her professional activities? What methods of decision-making are implemented and how do they affect the art circuit and the circulation of the arts? What does the contemporary system of art production look like? What rules and hegemonies govern it? Who is the decision-maker as far as the choice of a given artist and the publication of their works are concerned? Who includes and invites some artists to participate in the international festival circuit while others are excluded for months, seasons, and years to come? These are not solely academic questions, cocooned in theory and suspended in the vacuum of irrelevance to palpable socio-economic concerns. On the contrary, they touch upon a network of interrelations, interdependence, and connections between creators, producers, and audience, significantly influencing the shared space of contemporary theatre and dance.

“[C]urators are eloquent writers, intrepid researchers, communicative art educators, adaptable interpreters, sophisticated critics, proud editors, meticulously precise archivists, imaginative producers, socially critical politicians, painstakingly tough budget planners, mobile networking people, sensitive diplomats, clever lawyers, flexible project managers and stimulating agitators” (Jaschke 2012: 149). This description of the work of a curator, posited by Beatrice Jaschke, is a fitting list (quite ironic one…) of skills indispensable to the profession (and sometimes difficult to combine); it is not, however, exhaustive. For I define the curator as first and foremost a cultural producer, equipped with specific competences and functioning in a specific social and economic system which strongly determines her actions, oftentimes reducing the curator to a product of the said system. It is no coincidence that the profession of the so-called independent curator (one who is freelance and has no permanent ties to an institution) started to develop at the turn of the 1960s and the 1970s (in performing arts about a decade later), as the model of production evolved into post-Fordism and as late capitalism shaped. Non-material work/production is grounded in generating communication, creating network-based structures of information exchange, producing knowledge. A curator functions in a system which is a network, not a hierarchy; this does not mean her power is weaker, but rather that the alignment of the directions and vectors of that power are different. Curatorial praxis is, to a substantial extent, a product of late capitalism, embodying its key rules and mechanisms and at the same time becoming a tool legitimising and perpetuating these rules and mechanisms. The position of a curator is thus ambivalent, necessitating constant vigilance and critical attention. Visual artists have long criticised the position of curators; the criticism is not unwarranted: the unclear mechanism of the redistribution of power, the lack of transparency related to the reasons why some artists are included in the exhibition circuit and others excluded from it, and finally conflicts concerning authorship (such as who is the author of an exhibition: the curator? the artist? the viewer?) lead to tensions and clashes, raising valid objections on the part of artists.

Moreover, the figure of the so-called independent curator is emblematic for the projective city – a notion proposed by Luc Boltanski and Ḕve Chiapello, which is constitutive to the definition of late capitalism. In the projective city, economy and social relations are based on establishing contact, constructing networks of relations and mediations; actions are projective and by definition have a temporal framework; even in a project spanning many years, the date of its completion is known. Accessibility and alertness are central, as is openness to new ideas or contacts, for they result in new projects. The ability to establish many relations, but at the same time to carefully select the most valuable ones; the ability to remain receptive to information and to intuit the directions of actions; unceasing commitment (stellar qualifications do not suffice; passion and full commitment is a requirement); enthusiasm; mobility – but also the ability to assert one’s autonomy and defend one’s choices; specialist knowledge in a given area, enabling one to fulfill the role of an expert and a consultant are key characteristics of a worker in a projective city.

If the basis of production in cognitive capitalism is non-material work, which consists in the production of knowledge, generating communication, forming networks and migrating, then it appears that the entire contemporary festival industry is played out along these rules.

Interestingly, as Boltanski and Chiapello write in The New Spirit of Capitalism, the discourse of the model of non-material production has all but absorbed the buzzwords of the 1968 student revolt in Europe. These buzzwords (such as imagination, creativity, pleasure) have now become the foundation of the rules of work in the cognitive capitalist system. The work of a curator, who travels from one festival to another, does appear the fulfillment of the most utopian goals – it is nothing but pleasure, the opportunity to realise one’s passions, travel, meeting new people, forming new relations, building one’s own network of connections, in a nutshell – it is a permanent holiday, is it not? It is no coincidence that it is virtually impossible to separate the private and professional life of a curator; in late capitalism, in an economy governed by reputation, the distinction between work and leisure has been obliterated. The knowledge we produce will not come into being without a free flow of information, ideas, conversation; without what we like to call creative action and what Michael Hardt calls affective labor: emotional support, passion, an exchange of inspirations, and so on. The product is so tightly enmeshed with personal competences, closely related to individual emotional potential and to one’s experience, that the terms “private” and “professional” are rendered essentially indistinguishable. Cognitive capitalism rests on the production of knowledge; the production of knowledge is intimately related to individual predispositions. In his essay “Cruel Economy of Authorship” Kuba Szreder notes that the success of a cultural producer in this system is contingent on her efficiency in navigating different contexts, proficiency at networking, adroitness at forming the right connections, discerning good ideas and curating their publication; her success therefore boils down not so much to the process of work, but to the ability to detect and publish an interesting phenomenon. As an example, the most valued curators are those who not only skillfully navigate the networks of cooperation and various connections between artists, producers and the media, but also show unusual intuition; they are the first to seek out an interesting artist, hail him or her as a new “star”, label his or her work and make it visible to the world. Here, the ability to detect new trends, phenomena, directions, is fundamental, but the ability to label or articulate, publish, distribute and promote the given phenomenon/work/artist is no less important. Conversations between curators rest on personal relations, where the key factor is not even the amount of money a curator can spend, but what she has to say about a production she has just seen, whether her passion is genuine, whether her choices, recommendations, proposals engender trust. The credibility of a curator is thus equally the product of her professional competences and personal qualities.

Methodological research of, to use the term championed by among others Beatrice von Bismarck and Irit Rogoff, “the curatorial” (Beatrice von Bismarck, 2012), which in turn encompasses the profession of a curator itself as well as curatorial praxis, enables one to lay bare the normative matrix governing contemporary art production and distribution and to look closely at the interrelated mechanisms of selection, presentation, and evaluation that accompany art praxis. Such research indisputably corroborates the fact that the presence and visibility of artists (their existence on the art circuit) is not solely the sum total of their talent, luck, and serendipity but it is dependent on the decisions on the part of the powers that be, namely, on those that are responsible for the shaping of the circulation of the arts and for the building of audience-artist relations. In short, cultural producers worldwide.

The process in question is by no means transparent. It is painfully lacking in clearly defined rules and non-contestable, “objective” criteria. To considerable degree, the work of a curator is based on affect (the affective), personal (aesthetic) choices, and personalized competences, making it highly dependent on the individuality of the particular people tasked with a curatorial job as well as on their personal commitment and predisposition. This widespread and somehow signature phenomenon seems to be the consequence (some would argue one of the repercussions) of the development of contemporary art: one simply cannot evaluate art (or the arts for that matter) on the basis of any existing, or even better, “objective” criteria; works by contemporary artists defy all proscription – they openly flout conventions, rules, and regulations, as if offloading the reception and value judgement onto the audiences, equipped in turn with their individual competences and intuition. However, there is a middleperson between them, an intermediary known as a curator, who – in this context – appears to be an instructor, providing both the artists and the audience with some guidelines regarding the process at hand. She seems to be a teacher lecturing on the unteachable process and an interpreter of the untranslatable, who is responsible for providing the contextual framework that is often conducive to opening new and pluralized avenues of art reception. At other times, the said contextual framework may narrow down reception to one singularity. Does it mean that the art, which value never could be measured and always depended on one’s choice, is thus easily subjected to curatorial praxis? If art is “curated”, does it mean that to a certain degree the rules of art have been democratized or, rather the contrary, privatized?

I am convinced that conscious and reflexive analysis of the network of interrelatedness that creates, sustains, enwraps, and surrounds the art production system serves as the basis of critical thinking about contemporary theatre and dance. Equally, the analysis makes for a fitting starting point (or a point of departure) for all critical artists and critically-minded practitioners of art. The question we all should be asking ourselves at present is as follows: how, in the world governed by an almost alliance between the rampant capitalist economic model and art production, can we hold critical positions? How can we maintain a stance that is antithetical to the prevalent system? In what way can we not just think outside of the box but abandon the framework we have been dealt without committing social suicide and bringing our further work to a standstill? Finally, how not to be lulled into a false sense of security that writing a critical paper is all it takes?

What seems most apposite to the discussion is the case of Nie-boska. Szczątki, a play that was to have been directed by Oliver Frljić, rehearsed and duly prepared in the October and November of 2013 at the Old Theatre (Teatr Stary) in Cracow, Poland. The play, as it was conceptualised by Frljić, was never performed on stage. Nor was it seen by any audience. However, what it managed to do is spark a lot of controversy and generate a heated debate in the Polish theatre milieu, dividing it radically, causing a lot of personal affray, and, in general, wreaking havoc on the theatre circuit. Although the play and its unfortunate ramifications engendered a lot of considerable (and understandable) frustration as well as filled its creators with a sense of doom and failure, I consider Nie-boska. Szczątki (The Un-divine. Remains), unstaged as it was, to be paradoxically and puzzlingly triumphant. It is worth mentioning here, however, that my take on the complex issue is the product of extensive if external research: I had access to archival materials, to opinions expressed by both sides of the divide, and also to records of long conversations with the play’s creators.

Invited to the Old Theatre by its director Jan Klata, Oliver Frljić was to have directed an intertextual play revolving around and alluding to Zygmunt Krasiński’s 1833 Nie-boska komedia (The Un-divine Comedy), one of the key dramas of Polish Romanticism. Formerly, the play was adapted on stage in 1965 by legendary Polish theatre director Konrad Swinarski. Commissioned to provide his own directorial interpretation, Frljić opted to go back in time and use as his point of departure archival materials and memories of Swinarski’s play so as to later on, in the course of his play, focus on the issues of anti-Semitism, both indispensable to the understanding of the original text (Krasiński’s drama is frequently inherently anit-Semitic) and crucial in the context of the staging of the play by Swinarski in the Cracow of the mid-1960s. Frljić’s method of choice was to be an enabler of discussions with and between the ensemble that would touch upon the most burning and controversial socio-cultural issues. This instigated workflow of ideas was supposed to trigger prolonged improvisation, problematizing select topics and revealing the political intrinsic to them. During the course of the play, the ensemble’s on-stage heated debates were to be continued by audience members in the stalls and elsewhere, showing them in their full intensity the most antagonizing problems tackled by the play dug up by the director. The responsibility that the ensemble felt was huge as the director deprived them of the opportunity of “hiding” behind their role. By getting rid of the typical hierarchical power structure, he in consequence offloaded some of the responsibility for the play onto them. Starting on the first day of their rehearsal schedule, all ensemble members were given leeway so as to further continuation of their involvement in the play. In fact, some of them opted out.

In the meantime, after the events of November 11, 2013 (for a couple of years the Independence Day in Poland has been notorious for the escalation of right-wing bellicosity) the Old Theatre in Cracow became the centre of tension (and unwanted, ill-disposed attention): right-wing media activists, including journalists and frustrated artists not affiliated with the Old Theatre, orchestrated a series of absurd pickets and protests during plays as well as published a number of libellous newspaper articles in the conservative “Gazeta Polska” weekly. Purposefully containing half-truths and leaked information, the articles included reviews of as-yet-unpremiered plays. To make matters worse, the ensemble members received anonymous threats. On the one hand, Jan Klata, the director of the Old Theatre, adamantly supported the institution, and openly showed his displeasure at the arrested development of Nie-boska. Szczątki, on the other hand. Eventually, on the 26th of November, against the wishes of the creators of the play and masked by the pretence of providing the ensemble with requisite protection, Klata officially suspended the rehearsals.

Regardless of the practicality of his idea or of the result of the expected confrontation of Nie-boska. Szczątki with the audience (we were denied an opportunity to evaluate the play on our own), Frljić, alongside his associates (Agnieszka Jakimiak, Joanna Wichowska, and Goran Injac) managed to do something else, perhaps something even more important: to trigger a uniquely widespread, well-informed, and inclusive debate on the institution of theatre, on the arrangement of the power structures within it, on how individual responsibilities are assigned, and – finally – on the potentiality of the radical critical stance to be practiced in an institutionalized setting, as posited by Fred Moten and Stefano Harney in The Undercommons. Fugitive Planning and Black Study. (2013), their jointly written volume of essays. The critics postulate rescission of current rules and regulations, abdication of directorial authority, encouragement of risk-taking, introduction of artistic exploration and experimentation governed by the concept of equally assigned responsibility, and – most importantly – self-interrogation on the way to positioning oneself as an entity posing a fundamental problem to the very institution one is attempting to revolutionalise. A subversive theatre director, such as Frljić, who decides to play against the rules of institutionalized engagement, by abandoning his hierarchical position, violates the basic principles keeping the said institution, i.e. theatre, in check.

The Old Theatre behaved just like the authors of The Undercommons predicted: the presence of Frljić was construed as menace to the institutionalized hierarchy on the part of a trickster. For that reason alone, the play was called off before its premiere, clouded by impropriety, mutual accusations, and gross misunderstanding. As a result, instead of the play there emerged records and transcripts of diverse discussions on the subject, including a well-researched and informative series of materials in the “Didaskalia” periodical, in which the play’s dramaturges (Agnieszka Jakimiak and Joanna Wichowska) attempted to reconstruct the methods at work and the creative process that took place, while stage designer Anna-Maria Karczmarska described the rationale behind her scenography. A transcript of an extensive multilateral meeting at the Theatre Institute that included all the parties involved (only Jan Klata was absent) was also published. In addition, Agnieszka Jakimiak (Jakimiak, 2014) wrote an in-depth critical text, making a conscious effort to attempt thorough institutional critique with regard to public/state-funded theatre in Poland.

A form of dialogue, in its different shapes, sizes, and guises, has been ceaselessly attempted since the moment the Polish art circuit was first infiltrated by the curatorial model and which then began to clash with the entrenched system of public repertory theatres (be they municipal, voivodeship or state-funded). We suffer from the privation of a breath of fresh air: we are thus in desperate need of airing the ruling theatre system. Analogously, we require more breathing space: space for interdisciplinary projects, sites for dance events, sufficient symbolic and physical room for up-and-coming artists. On the other hand, project-driven existence as well as curatorial models are emblematic of the post-1989 neoliberal paradigm that rules supreme in Poland, having brought on all of its signature consequences: precarity, instability, unpredictability, self-exploitation, and the like. Still, I consider the moment of the historical merger of the two systems, of their head-on collision as a fascinating rite of passage, a threshold leading up to a space of potentially radical critique, providing in turn a means of re-formulating the paradigms operating at the core of both socio-economic systems.

Characteristically of the critical approach that the authors of The Undercommons advocate, out of two viable means of maintaining a critical stance on all institutional forms (the first one involves a full-on frontal assault on the emanations of the neoliberal system while the second one focuses on intellectual critique of the system from the inside through widely available and accepted means: articles, discussions, interviews, etc.), Moten and Harney choose a third option: constant, radical changes within the institution, entailing permanent if varied problematisation and interrogation of existing (power) structures with a view to their reforming. What seems self-explanatory and obvious ceases to be so; the institutional framework ought to be contested and conceptualized anew. It is sobering, however, to read in The Undercommons that remaining critical and self-reflexive within an institution and with recourse to cut-and-dried modes of expression/resistance poses a risk of complicity and the legitimization of institutions. As observed by Moten and Harney, being a critical academic involves augmenting and endorsing the framework disseminated by institutions. If we relate their insightful train of thought to the case study of the Old Theatre, then we may notice that somehow, by agreeing to “finish” Nie-boska. Szczątki in Frljić’s stead, Monika Strzępka and Paweł Demirski, have found themselves caught between Scylla and Charybdis. Undoubtedly, the forthcoming play will be intriguing and important while its creators will critically, scathingly, and mockingly allude to the disturbing events that took place a few months ago in the Old Theatre. However, the duo’s work also significantly contributes to the proliferation of the status quo, one way or another allowing both the internalization of their own resistance and the institutionalization of the critical stance to occur and take effect. Perhaps even to take its toll.

Seen in the context of the disassembling (Frljić) and subsequent pacification (Demirski, Strzępka) of the critical potential inherent in Nie-boska. Szczątki, one begins to doubt whether even imagining not just an artist but also a curator as a veritable trouble-maker, as a trickster, as a rabble-rouser is justified. To what extent is it possible to transgress one’s affectivity that the profession of a curator is informed by so at to enable the real critique of institutions to firmly take root? Perhaps, what is at stake is one’s self-reflexive criticism, the ceaseless problematisation and interrogation of one’s curatorship, as in The Curators’ Piece, when bombarded with fundamental and tricky questions, one does not perform any evasive manoeuvres but confesses one’s hesitance, self-doubt, and dilemmas by simply stating publicly: “I don’t know”, “I’m trying”, “I’m thinking”, “I’m searching”, “I am not sure”. In consequence, clearly outside of one’s comfort zone, one is susceptible to rejection not only on the part of the audience but of the institution one is employed by as well. After all, what may potentially be the solution here is abandoning the tried and failed language of power and embracing the little tried language of dialogue – even if by doing so we risk not just merely shattering our dreams but smashing our heads against yet another surprisingly concrete utopia.

translated by Bartosz Wójcik

 

Bibliography:

Luc Boltanski, Eve Chiapello, The new spirit od capitalism, London/New York 2005

Michael Hardt, Affective Labor, boundary 2/1999, p. 89-100, Duke University Press

Agnieszka Jakimiak, Ta dziwna instytucja zwana spektaklem (That Strange Insitution We Call a Play), “Didaskalia” 119/2014

Beatrice Jeschke, Curating. A profession in transition, in Maria Hussakowska (ed.), “Talking about Exhibition”, Kraków 2012

Marysia Lewandowska, Laurel Ptak (eds.), Undoing Property?,  Berlin 2013

Fred Moten and Stefano Harney, The Undercommons. Fugitive Planning and Black Study, 2013

Irit Rogoff and Beatrice von Bismarck, Curating/Curatorial, in Beatrice von Bismarck, Jörn Scaafaff, Thomas Weski, eds., Cultures of the Curatorial, Berlin 2012

text was written for the conference „The Public Commons and the Undercommons of Art, Education and Labor”, An International Conference hosted by the MA program Choreography and Performance (Gießen) 29.05.2014 – 01.06.2014

 

 


2 Komentarze

Remiksy w Komunie Warszawa (2010-2013)

Sezon Remiksów trwał cztery lata, od kwietnia 2010 roku (cykl rozpoczął Wojtek Ziemilski i jego “Poor Theatre: Remiks”) do grudnia 2013 (ostatnie wydarzenia to festiwal “RE//MIX Finał”), zrealizowano 32 premiery i aneks, wszystkie w trybie projektowym, w ramach dotacji uzyskanych z Urzędu m. st. Warszawy, Ministerstwa Kultury i Dziedzictwa Narodowego oraz Instytutu Muzyki i Tańca. Producentem całości była Komuna Warszawa, działająca od końca 2009 roku w Warszawie przy Lubelskiej 30/32 jako “pogrobowiec i spadkobierca Komuny Otwock”, pomysłodawcą – Tomasz Plata, kuratorką i producentką spektakli powstających w latach 2012 i 2013 – Magda Grudzińska. Kilka spektakli objechało duże międzynarodowe festiwale i ważne ośrodki kultury (m.in. Kraków, Lublin, Poznań), a młodzi twórcy sztuk performatywnych (m.in. Weronika Szczawińska, Mikołaj Mikołajczyk, Ramona Nagabczyńska, Kaya Kołodziejczyk, Karol Tymiński, Weronika Pelczyńska, Aleksandra Borys, Marta Ziółek, Iwona Pasińska, Iza Szostak, Karol Radziszewski, Dorota Sajewska, Łukasz Chotkowski, Krzysztof Garbaczewski i Marcin Cecko, Strzępka i Demirski, Wojtek Ziemilski) otrzymali zaproszenie do pracy nad nowymi produkcjami. Jednocześnie zadbano o zbudowanie ważnego kontekstu kolejnych prezentacji: nie ma w tej chwili w Polsce miejsca, w którym wymienieni wyżej artyści mogliby spotkać się w jednej przestrzeni, w określonych ramach czasowych, a do tego skonfrontować swoją pracę z tradycją polskiego teatru alternatywnego (m.in. Akademią Ruchu, Teatrem Strefa Ciszy czy Komuną właśnie).

Klucz wyboru artystów biorących udział w czteroletnim projekcie RE//MIX opierał się na intuicji i doświadczeniu kuratorów. W przypadku tej części programu, która dotyczyła tańca, nie bez znaczenia pozostało też instytucjonalne wsparcie (mam tu na myśli przede wszystkim choreografów i tancerzy, których część pojawiła się w projekcie w ramach konkursów ogłaszanych przez Instytut Muzyki i Tańca oraz Komunę). Wybór artysty remiksowanego bywał wypadkową indywidualnych zainteresowań danego twórcy i programowych decyzji Komuny. Każdy uczestnik kolejnej odsłony cyklu miał do dyspozycji te same warunki pracy: kilka tygodni prób, opiekę kuratora i producenta, przygotowanie premiery, promocję. Warunki w pełni profesjonalne, chociaż oczywiście różne od tych, które oferuje wciąż bezwzględnie dominujący w Polsce model dramatycznego teatru repertuarowego. Charakter finansowania projektu wymusił ograniczenie eksploatacji spektakli; jak zwykle w projektowym finansowaniu kultury możliwe było zdobycie minimalnych środków na produkcję wydarzenia, ale już nie na jego eksploatację. A szkoda – powstałe propozycje z powodzeniem mogłyby być grane wielokrotnie, nie tylko w Warszawie: Remiksy, pierwotnie pomyślane jako rodzaj laboratorium, okazały się znakomitą i unikatową propozycją repertuarową.

To, co jednak wydaje mi się szczególnie cenne w tym projekcie, to jego potencjał krytyczny: wobec kanonu obowiązującego w polskim teatrze, wobec historycznych i współczesnych prób definicji performansu i wreszcie – wobec instytucji teatru.

1.

Pomysł był prosty: chodziło o zarysowanie obszaru sztuki współczesnej, z którego wyrasta i któremu bliska jest Komuna Warszawa; celem było zbudowanie kontekstu ich dotychczasowych oraz planowanych działań, pokazanie źródeł inspiracji, wskazanie najciekawszych zdaniem Komuny twórców sztuk performatywnych, wizualnych i muzyki w Polsce, a przede wszystkim zmapowanie przestrzeni zainteresowań i możliwych kierunków rozwoju Komuny. Artyści zaproszeni do projektu zostali poproszeni o odniesienie się do tych twórców, którzy byli lub są dla nich ważni – czy to jako nauczyciele (np. Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker w remiksie Kai Kołodziejczyk), jako daleka inspiracja (Aleksandra Borys i jej reinterpretacja praktyk improwizacyjnych Anne Halprin) czy też jako źródło buntu i rozpoczęcia samodzielnej drogi artystycznej (Iwona Pasińska w remiksie Conrada Drzewieckiego). Wśród remiksowanych twórców znalazły się najważniejsze postaci teatru, tańca, muzyki, literatury XX wieku; artyści, którzy ukształtowali krytyczne i eksperymentalne myślenie o sztuce, w tym m.in. Anna Teresa de Keersmaeker, Yvonne Rainer, Trisha Brown, Carolee Schneemann, Anne Halprin, Merce Cunnigham, John Cage, Robert Wilson, Jérôme Bel, Marina Abramović, Laurie Anderson, Bertolt Brecht, Miron Białoszewski, Akademia Ruchu, Living Theatre, The Wooster Group, Dario Fo, Frank Castorf. Każdy kolejny spektakl cyklu rozpoczynał się kilkunastominutowym, filmowanym wykładem na temat twórczości danego remiksowanego twórcy. Powstał spójny, konsekwentny program, w którym polscy artyści mogli zrewidować obowiązujący w Polsce kanon teatralny i odnieść się do prac kluczowych dwudziestowiecznych twórców m.in. teatru partycypacyjnego, muzyki awangardowej, tańca krytycznego, improwizacji, performansu, teatru politycznego. Jak zauważył Grzegorz Laszuk, przestrzeń teatralna w Polsce bardzo skostniała, zamarzła w obrębie pojedynczych teatrów repertuarowych, odizolowawszy się od tego, co najciekawsze w muzyce, sztukach wizualnych, w nauce. “Naszym celem było z jednej strony stworzenie teatralnego kanonu, który pokazałby, skąd Komuna się wzięła, z drugiej – pokazanie, czym jest ten „dziwny teatr”, nie będący klasycznym repertuarowym teatrem instytucjonalnym. Dla nas było i jest naturalne, że teatr to miejsce przenikania i współpracy wielu dziedzin, co wciąż nie jest popularną drogą myślenia w środowisku teatralnym.” Oczywiście nie jest tak, jak chciałby tego Tomasz Plata, że to dzięki remiksom “w „Didaskaliach” pojawiają się teksty, w których widać inne myślenie o teatrze”; ta niefortunna wypowiedź Platy trafnie zresztą obnaża pewien proces samoizolacji polskiego środowiska teatralnego. Recenzje, teksty analityczne, eseje, wywiady i tłumaczenia dotyczące m.in. tańca krytycznego czy konceptualnego oraz rozmaitych projektów interdyscyplinarnych pojawiają się w “Didaskaliach” regularnie od dobrych kilkunastu lat; towarzyszą im również pokazy prac artystów pracujących poza ramami instytucjonalnego teatru repertuarowego, zapraszane na rozmaite festiwale (m.in. Krakowskie Reminiscencje Teatralne czy Festiwal Malta i program Stary Browar Nowy Taniec na Malcie).

Naturalnie jednak są to jedynie pierwsze kroki w kierunku rozwoju współczesnych sztuk performatywnych w Polsce; budowanie dyskursu, festiwale, działania impresaryjne, nawet koprodukcje na dłuższą metę nie wystarczą. Dalej jak powietrza brakuje instytucji, która umożliwiłaby młodym artystom wyrwanie się z błędnego koła projektowego i stworzyła im szansę regularnego rozwoju, co w tym przypadku oznacza przede wszystkim możliwość pracy nad nowymi produkcjami i eksploatację dotychczasowych. Cykl remiksów w Komunie Warszawa wyraźnie pokazał potencjał stworzenia takiej instytucji w tym właśnie miejscu.

2.

Remiks, jak przypominali twórcy projektu, “to pojęcie zapożyczone z muzyki: oznacza utwór powstały w wyniku przetworzenia innego utworu. Nie jest po prostu „interpretacją”, podaniem oryginału nowymi środkami wyrazu czy w nowej aranżacji. Choć może zawierać oryginalne fragmenty (tzw. sample), to są one jedynie cytatami. remiks jest utworem nowym, odnoszącym się treścią lub formą do pierwowzoru, dyskutującym z nim, nostalgicznie wspominającym lub na nowo odczytującym.”

W przypadku sztuk performatywnych podstawowe pytanie brzmi: co remiksujemy? Nie ma tak oczywistego materiału do pracy, jak w muzyce. W niektórych przypadkach artyści uczestniczący w projekcie Komuny Warszawa mieli do dyspozycji archiwalne nagrania, fotografie, notatki, recenzje, a więc rozmaite materiały dokumentujące proces pracy danego twórcy. Częściej – wyłącznie relacje zapośredniczone, historie fikcyjne, obrosłe mitami, a także własną pamięć, wrażenia, doświadczenia, intuicje. Dlatego większość spektakli zrealizowanych w ramach cyklu nie miała charakteru reprodukcji, reprezentacji czy odtworzenia danego wydarzenia;  najciekawsze remiksy powstawały na przecięciu indywidualnych wspomnień ich twórców, rewizji mitów i autorytetów, w procesie przywoływania i kształtowania kolektywnej pamięci.

Świetnym przykładem jest tutaj jeden z najlepszych spektakli powstałych w ramach cyklu: “Lidia Zamkow” Weroniki Szczawińskiej. Pisałam już o nim gdzie indziej, tutaj przypomnę tylko metodę pracy nad spektaklem. Autorom remiksu udało się zgromadzić jedynie bardzo skromny materiał, który w dodatku ani nie budził entuzjazmu do samej postaci Zamkow (fatalne spektakle, wywiad pełen społecznych klisz i mizoginizmu) ani nie wydawał się szczególnie wiarygodny: dlaczego Lidia Zamkow, aktorka i reżyserka, twórczyni osiemdziesięciu przedstawień, nie istnieje w świadomości reżyserów młodego pokolenia, a w konstruowanej współcześnie historii polskiego teatru pojawia się marginalnie; dlaczego brak wyczerpujących tekstów na temat jej pracy i rzetelnej dokumentacji spektakli; dlaczego w rozmowach wykładowców warszawskiej Akademii Teatralnej pojawia się wyłącznie w anegdotach? Być może o Zamkow wiemy tak niewiele, ponieważ była słabą reżyserką i przepadła, jak wielu jej podobnych. A może zniknęła w wyniku jakiegoś przypadku? Na pewno wiemy o niej tak mało, że możemy zbudować sobie właściwie dowolny jej obraz – wystarczy, za autorami spektaklu, wymyślić „dwie, trzy rzeczy, które o niej wiesz”.

Ramą dla spektaklu Szczawińskiej był fikcjonalizowany wykład Agaty Adamieckiej-Sitek, pełen językowych i kulturowych klisz, budujący kuszący, ale przecież nieprawdziwy obraz Zamkow jako buntowniczej, zapomnianej feministki lat 60. W ten sposób autorzy spektaklu przywołali i obnażyli procesy zapamiętywania i zapominania, mechanizmy tworzenia fikcyjnych historii wokół bohaterów, dopisywania im rozmaitych cech, które bardzo chcielibyśmy w nich zobaczyć.

“Lidia Zamkow. Dwie albo trzy rzeczy, które o niej wiesz” świetnie pokazuje, że remiks nie może być po prostu odtworzeniem “oryginalnego” wydarzenia czy postaci – ale nie tylko z powodu braku materiałów. Pojawia się tutaj raczej pytanie, czym miałoby być “oryginalne” wydarzenie, które stanowiłoby “wiarygodny” punkt odniesienia?

Musimy w tym miejscu odwołać się do definicji wydarzenia performatywnego. Zachodnioeuropejskie myślenie o performansie, proponowane m.in. w perspektywie antropologicznej (Richarda Schechner czy Marvin Carlson) podkreśla jego niepowtarzalność i “zdarzeniowość”. Podobnie pisze Peggy Phelan w słynnym tekście “The ontology of performance” (Ontologia performansu): “performans istnieje tylko w teraźniejszości. Nie może być zachowany, zarejestrowany, udokumentowany, ani też w inny sposób zostać włączony w obieg reprezentacji przedstawień; jeśli tak się wydarzy, przestaje być performansem (…) Performans, w czym przypomina proponowaną tutaj ontologię podmiotowości, odbywa się poprzez zanikanie”. Ta cecha performasu jest zdaniem autorki jego największą wartością – pozwala na krytykę ekonomicznego systemu, warunkującego zasady produkcji sztuki. Efemeryczność wydarzenia performatywnego, jego “niereprodukowalność” oznacza zatem potencjał krytyczny performansu, jest punktem wyjścia z ideologii kapitalistycznej, z przymusu ciągłej reprodukcji i dokumentacji. Ale równocześnie, zdaniem Phelan, stawia nieuchwytny i niepowtarzalny performans na szarym końcu sztuki współczesnej.

Co więcej, praca Weroniki Szczawińskiej i jej zespołu nad remiksem o Lidii Zamkow przywołuje opisywany przez Phelan projekt Sophie Calle w Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum w Bostonie w latach dziewięćdziesiątych. Tak, jak Calle wypełniła miejsca po skradzionych obrazach wspomnieniami na ich temat, zebranymi wśród widzów muzeum, tak Szczawińska wypełnia puste miejsca w historii Lidii Zamkow rozmaitymi wspomnieniami i możliwymi interpretacjami zebranego materiału, tematyzując przy tym sam proces konstruowania wspomnień.

Proces pracy nad cyklem Remiksów w Komunie Warszawa ujawnił jednak wątpliwości dotyczące reprezentowanego m.in Phelan sposobu myślenia o performansie. Czy rzeczywiście jego niematerialność jest cechą zarówno wyróżniającą, jak i wykluczającą performans z obiegu sztuki? Czy tekst Phelan nie odnosi się wyłącznie do ram paradygmatu modernistycznego i zachodnio-centrycznego myślenia o sztuce? Dlaczego rozmaite formy pamięci o performansie nie miałyby mieć statusu prawomocnej dokumentacji? Dlaczego to materialność dokumentu uważana jest za najważniejszą jego cechą uwiarygadniającą? Co wobec tego z pamięcią ciała? Co z pamięcią emocjonalną, wrażeniową, co z indywidualną intuicją, wreszcie – z afektywnym czy somatycznym odbiorem sztuki? W imię czego mamy je traktować jako nieprawomocne?

Za tymi pytaniami pojawiają się kolejne: czy archiwa performansu są na pewno niemożliwe? Jak wobec tego badać problematykę kolekcjonowania performansów, prowadzonego przez najważniejsze muzea na świecie? I czym w tej sytuacji są proponowane przez Komunę Warszawa remiksy? Co jest i co może być remiksowane? Ta perspektywa jest szczególnie ciekawa w kontekście pracy z autorytetami. Phelan wskazuje, że “działanie instytucji wystawienniczej często sprowadza się do wstawienia arcydzieła do domowego aresztu, a więc zamknięcia go przed obiegiem wszelkich komentarzy uznanych przez nią za krytyczne czy nieprawomocne”. Podobny efekt obserwujemy w przypadku niektórych instytucji teatralnych czy tanecznych i związanych z nimi postaci kluczowych dla rozwoju polskiej sztuki (np. Stary Teatr w Krakowie i postać Konrada Swinarskiego, Polski Teatr Tańca w Poznaniu i Conrad Drzewiecki). Założenia programowe cyklu Remiksów, uwalniające twórców z ciężaru danych instytucji i ich historii, umożliwiły świeże, czasem krytyczne spojrzenie na takie postaci, jak np. Jerzy Grotowski (w remiksie Doroty Sajewskiej i Karola Radziszewskiego), czy właśnie Conrad Drzewiecki (w remiksie Iwony Pasińskiej).

Tymczasem w fundamentalnym dla współczesnego myślenia o sztukach performatywnych tekście Rebecci Schneider: “Archiwa. Pozostałości performansu”, powstałym niejako odpowiedzi Peggy Phelan, Schneider nazywa i podważa ramy zachodnio-centrycznego myślenia o performansie i działaniach performatywnych. Wskazuje, że “archiwum jest elementem konstytutywnym dla kultury zachodniej. Odkrywamy samych siebie w odniesieniu do gromadzonych przez nas materiałów, śladów, które oznaczamy, opisujemy, wystawiamy i cytujemy; materialnych śladów, które potrafimy rozpoznać”. I stawia pytanie: “czy zrównanie performansu z nieciągłością i stratą zamiast podważać, nie pogłębia naszego przywiązania do ideologii imperialistycznej, ukrytej w logice archiwum?”.

Cykl remiksów w Komunie Warszawa stawia podobne pytania o źródła i status archiwów sztuk performatywnych. Co jest uprawomocnionym obrazem a co nim nie jest? Kto tworzył historię/dokumenty o performansie? Dlaczego jego wersja ma być tą obowiązującą? Jak wreszcie określić “skończone” wydarzenie teatralne, gotowe do prezentacji, umieszczenia w repertuarze, promocji i sprzedaży – a zatem także jak i z czego budować repertuar we współczesnej instytucji teatralnej, tanecznej, performatywnej? Remiksy pokazały, że jest tak wiele “ontologii” performansu, jak wielu jest jego odbiorców, którzy w oparciu o swoje doświadczenia, intuicję, wrażenia zmysłowe budują własną pamięć o performansie. Pamięć ta zawsze zależna jest zatem od emocji, wiedzy, ale także od pamięci kolektywnej, od danego kontekstu politycznego, społecznego, ekonomicznego.

Tymczasem zwróćmy uwagę, że naturalną konsekwencją przyglądania się współczesnemu performansowi jest problematyzacja instytucji teatru i tańca, odpowiedzialnej za jego produkcję, prezentację, a więc za stworzenie właściwych warunków pracy artystom i otwarcie przestrzeni dla publiczności.

3.

Kiedy w roku 1990 Gilles Deleuze pisał: “jesteśmy świadkami powszechnego kryzysu wszystkich przestrzeni zamknięcia – więzienia, szpitala, szkoły, fabryki, rodziny” oraz o kryzysie instytucji jako “stopniowym i rozproszonym wdrażaniem nowego reżimu dominacji”, krytyka instytucjonalna na gruncie sztuk wizualnych przechodziła właśnie tzw. drugą falę. Artyści podejmujący krytykę warunków pracy nie zwracali już tylko uwagi na zinstytucjonalizowane ramy produkcji i prezentacji sztuki, a więc na kontekst społeczny, ekonomiczny, polityczny takich instytucji, jak muzea, ale problematyzowali prawomocność i podmiotowość własnego głosu w kontekście tak instytucji sztuki, jak i w przestrzeni publicznej, zdominowanej przecież przez społeczne i kulturowe mechanizmy komunikacji oraz produkcji wiedzy i jej redystrybucji. Deleuze wskazywał, że widoczny na przełomie lat 80. i 90. kryzys instytucji jako kryzys rozmaitych przestrzeni zamknięcia, fundamentalnych dla projektu modernistycznego, związany był z przejściem od społeczeństw dyscyplinarnych (za Foucaultem) do społeczeństw kontroli. Rozpadał się wówczas nie tylko pewien projekt kulturowy, ale i system ekonomiczny; kapitalizm przemysłowy w Europie Zachodniej i USA powoli wypierany był przez kognitywny, a więc systemu produkcji zastępowano m.in. kupowaniem i sprzedawaniem usług. Deleuze pisał o tym tak: “To kapitalizm zorientowany nie na produkcję, ale na produkt, czyli rynek albo sprzedaż. Jest także ze swej istoty rozpraszający, dlatego fabryka ustąpiła miejsca przedsiębiorstwu. Rodzina, szkoła, armia, fabryka, nie są już odrębnymi przestrzeniami związanymi analogią, odsyłającymi do właściciela, państwa, lub prywatnej władzy, lecz podatnymi na deformacje i przekształcenia zaszyfrowanymi figurami jednego przedsiębiorstwa, które posiada wyłącznie menedżerów.”

Kilka lat wcześniej, w 1984 roku, Hans Haacke pisał w tekście “Muzea, menadżerowie świadomości”: “Cały świat sztuki, a w szczególności muzea, należą do tego, co nazywano <przemysłem świadomości>” i wskazywał na ryzykowne fuzje modelu instytucji sztuki z modelem biznesowym: “Wskutek naiwności, potrzeby lub przywiązania do funduszy korporacyjnych, muzea znajdują się w tej chwili na grząskiej ścieżce prowadzącej do przekształcenia ich w działaczy PR na rzecz interesów wielkiego biznesu i związanej z nim ideologii”.
Oczywiście, zarówno perspektywa Deleuze’a, jak i twórców nurtu krytyki instytucjonalnej jest zachodnio-centryczna. Zmiany te wyglądały inaczej w krajach za żelazną kurtyną. Po 1989 roku w Polsce gwałtownie przekształcano system ekonomiczny w kapitalizm, od razu w jego neoliberalną wersję. Stąd mały polski turbo-kapitalizm, będący niejednokrotnie karykaturą procesów, przez które przez minione sześćdziesiąt lat przechodziły gospodarki i kultury państw na zachodzie Europy. Na polskim gruncie teatralnym wyraźny nurt krytyki instytucjonalnej możemy odnaleźć w działalności ruchu teatru tzw. alternatywnego czy też niezależnego. Jednym z najbardziej wyrazistych przykładów będzie tu Akademia Ruchu i inspirujące się jej pracami Teatr Strefa Ciszy czy Komuna Otwock. Stąd też nic dziwnego, że to właśnie z tej tradycji, w początkach działań Komuny Warszawa, pojawiła się jedna z najodważniejszych prób krytyki modelu instytucji repertuarowego teatru publicznego.

Kuratorski projekt cyklu Remiksów kwestionuje ramy budowania repertuaru, ale też problematyzuje mechanizmy powstawania i funkcjonowania instytucji teatralnej. Remiksy to przecież świetna propozycja alternatywnego wobec wciąż dominującego w polskim środowisku teatralnym myślenia tak o repertuarze, jak i o możliwościach jego realizacji. Uważam, że nie przypadkiem instytucja teatru repertuarowego przeżywa wyraźny kryzys, ewoluując w stronę teatru rozrywkowego, kostniejąc w tradycji lub przekształcając się powoli w kuratorowane projekty (na gruncie polskim: Teatr Dramatyczny im. J. Szaniawskiego w Wałbrzych pod dyrekcją Sebastiana Majewskiego, Stary Teatr w Krakowie prowadzony przez Jana Klatę i Sebastiana Majewskiego, Teatr Dramatyczny w Warszawie pod wodzą Pawła Miśkiewicza i Doroty Sajewskiej, Teatr Polski w Bydgoszczy kierowany przez Pawła Łysaka).

Kryzys instytucji teatru repertuarowego jest wyraźnie widoczny: dobrze rozwija się nowy polski teatr polityczny, mocno inspirowany nurtem niemieckiego teatru krytycznego, ale nadąża za nim ledwie kilka polskich teatrów. Pozostałe przestały być miejscem spotkań młodych ludzi. Miejscem najgorętszych, najbardziej ciekawych dyskusji o współczesności stały się galerie sztuki współczesnej. Dlaczego moduł teatru instytucjonalnego się wyczerpuje? Dlaczego konieczne jest poszukiwanie nowych form? Zdaje się, że jak zwykle w takich przypadkach chodzi (po prostu!) o nadążanie za rzeczywistością.

Oczywiście program remiksów w Komunie Warszawa nie jest rozwiązaniem idealnym. Cykl uzależniony był od projektowego modelu finansowania kultury, który niesie za sobą poważne ryzyko tak dla instytucji, jak i dla samych twórców: konieczność ciągłej gotowości do produkcji nowych spektakli bez szansy na eksploatację tych istniejących, wymóg ciągłego dostosowywania się do priorytetów grantodawców, brak długofalowej perspektywy, a zatem i poczucia bezpieczeństwa, prekarne warunki pracy, samo-eksploatacja. Z pewnością trzeba być świadomym uwarunkowań ekonomicznych – to, co jest możliwe, to krytyczne posłużenie się dostępnymi narzędziami produkcji, czujność, uwaga, ciągła autokrytyka. To oczywiście fascynujący, ale trudny, wymagający proces. Z punktu widzenia polityków i decydentów, tak przywiązanych do neoliberalnego myślenia – również kosztowny, bo wymagający długotrwałej pracy i nie dający natychmiastowych efektów. Ale to też proces, który polskiemu teatrowi i jego twórcom potrzebny jest jak powietrze.

Tekst został opublikowany w „Dialogu” nr 3/2014


Dodaj komentarz

Faceci w czerni

„Czy zdarzyło ci się kiedyś zaprosić kogoś na festiwal tylko dlatego, że to twój przyjaciel? Czy miałeś kiedyś romans z zaproszonym przez siebie artystą? Ile godzin spędziłeś w tym roku w samolocie? Ile nocy w hotelu? Robisz festiwal dla publiczności czy przeciwko niej? Za jaką sztukę gotów byłbyś umrzeć? Jaka jest główna myśl, wokół której programujesz festiwal?” – po ostatnim pytaniu na długo zapadła cisza. Wreszcie Anna Garlicka, kuratorka festiwalu Kontrapunkt, odpowiada: „To ciekawe, co pan mówi. Nigdy nie myślałam o festiwalu w ten sposób”.

Sytuacja miała miejsce podczas Curator’s Piece: A Trial Against Art, czyli spektaklu, który pokazano na Kontrapunkcie w Szczecinie w kwietniu 2012 roku. Pomysłodawczyniami i reżyserkami spektaklu były Petra Zanki, chorwacka choreografka i tancerka oraz Tea Tupajić, dramaturżka i reżyserka, pracująca w Zagrzebiu. Artystki zaprosiły do współpracy kuratorów festiwali sztuk performatywnych, ważnych na gruncie lokalnym i w kontekście międzynarodowym.

Badania przygotowawcze do projektu zajęły wiele miesięcy, artystki podróżowały po Europie, spotykały kolejnych kuratorów, przeprowadzały wywiady, zbierały materiały. I nade wszystko próbowały nakłonić kuratorów, tych „facetów (i kobiety!) w czerni”, obecnych zawsze za kulisami i decydujących o kształcie współczesnych sztuk performatywnych, by złamali swoją żelazną zasadę i wyszli na scenę. Po co? Curator’s Piece to przede wszystkim znakomity, błyskotliwy eksperyment na teatrze, rozprawiający się bezlitośnie i z humorem z mechanizmami rządzącymi tym obszarem sztuki i stawiający w pełnym świetle ważnych jego przedstawicieli i zarazem decydentów: kuratorów. Każdy z nich jest tutaj jednocześnie performerem, współpracownikiem (współodpowiedzialnym za scenariusz) oraz koproducentem: spektakl był pokazywany na większości festiwali, które prowadzą uczestnicy projektu. A Trial Against Art jest fascynującą próbą zakwestionowania ram i zasad, w których teatr funkcjonuje na co dzień; spektakl bada relacje sceny z publicznością i każdego wieczoru pozwala widzom na nowo zadać sobie pytanie, do jakiego stopnia kuratorzy świadomi są zarówno tego, czym się zajmują, jak i konsekwencji własnej pracy.

1.

Zawód kuratora, wciąż dość nowy w teatrze i tańcu, w sztukach wizualnych od lat stanowi temat żywych dyskusji (o temperaturze rozpiętej od gloryfikacji po zapędy mordercze). Za początek zdefiniowania kuratorstwa jako samodzielnego zawodu uznaje się najczęściej rok 1969, kiedy Harald Szeemann przygotował swą pierwszą autorską, samodzielną wystawę When attitudes become form, zrealizowaną w Kunsthalle w Bernie w Szwajcarii.

Jeden z autorów tekstów w katalogu, Scott Burton, jako motta użył cytatu z Molloya Becketta: „Saying is inventing”. Co takiego zatem zostało nazwane, pokazane, a tym samym „włączone” do oficjalnego obiegu przez Szeemanna? Dlaczego to wydarzenie stało się punktem zwrotnym w myśleniu tak o praktyce kuratorskiej, jak i w ogóle o wystawie, o sposobie prezentowania sztuki, jej przedstawiania? Wystawa pokazała najnowsze prace tamtego czasu, zestawiając ze sobą post-minimalistów, Arte Povera i sztukę konceptualną. Po raz pierwszy na gruncie europejskiej instytucji pokazano razem artystów konceptualnych, co było wówczas bardzo odważnym gestem i przyniosło wystawie zarówno wielki rozgłos, jak i liczne kontrowersje. Wtedy to zapoczątkowano krytykę statusu obiektu sztuki, kanonu wystawienniczego i instytucji jako ideologicznej ramy wystawy, inspirując tym samym powstanie nurtu nawołującego do dematerializacji sztuki. Jednak zarząd Kunsthalle uznał, że wybór kuratora był zbyt śmiały i niebezpieczny dla renomy muzeum, zażądał więc od twórcy wystawy poskromienia kolejnych zamysłów i dostosowania się do ram instytucji. Odpowiedzią ze strony Szeemanna była rezygnacja ze stanowiska dyrektora Kunsthalle i ogłoszenie własnej niezależności. Rozpoczął odtad pracę niezależnego kuratora, nie związanego na stałe z żadną instytucją (do czasu), „wynajmowanego” do kolejnych projektów i wystaw (w 1972 został kuratorem piątych Documenta w Kassel).

Hans Ulrich Obrist, jedna z bardziej wyrazistych postaci współczesnego kuratorstwa w Europie, twórca dość kontrowersyjnego dyskursu wokół zawodu kuratora (jest autorem „podręczników” w rodzaju Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Curating But Were Afraid to Ask. A Brief History of Curating czy kilkutomowego zbioru The conversation series, wszystkie w formie wywiadów z artystami i innymi kuratorami) zwraca uwagę, że to właśnie od momentu, kiedy Harald Szeemann zrezygnował z pracy w Bernie, zwykł przedstawiać się jako Ausstellungsmacher, czyli twórca i zarazem producent wystaw.

Co ważne, legendarna wystawa Szeemanna łamała obowiązujące konwencje także dlatego, że w dużym stopniu przekształciła się w działanie performatywne, w happening, otwierając przestrzeń doświadczania i żywej rozmowy artystów z publicznością. W efekcie wystawa stała się przestrzenią społeczną. Sam Szeemann natomiast zwykł wówczas porównywać swoją praktykę kuratorską do działań reżysera teatralnego.

Model pracy, zainaugurowany przez Szeemanna pod koniec lat sześćdziesiątych, stopniowo rozwijał się i znajdował coraz liczniejszych kontynuatorów. Ich obecność związana była nie tylko z rozwojem nurtu sztuk koceptualnych (kurator jako autor kontekstu wokół prac artystów, a zatem także jako tłumacz, pośrednik, negocjator), ale również z rozwojem (w tzw. kulturze zachodniej) społeczeństw postindustrialnych, w których miejsce oraz status pracy materialnej stopniowo zajmowała praca umysłowa, służąca przede wszystkim rozwojowi komunikacji i tworzeniu kontaktów sieciowych.

Zapoczątkowana w tym samym czasie krytyka instytucji muzeów oraz praktyk wystawienniczych (w tym reguł tworzenia kanonu sztuki, a więc tego, co warto pokazać, a co powinno zostać zarchiwizowane w magazynach) stała się kluczowym kontekstem dla rozmowy o kuratorze i przyjmowanych przezeń strategiach. Pod koniec lat osiemdziesiątych kuratorowanie zaczęło być rozumiane jako aktywne uczestnictwo, niemal współudział w procesie artystycznym. Wystawy stały się formą estetycznych manifestów samych kuratorów oraz metodą ich autoprezentacji i autopromocji. Tego rodzaju mechanizmy zresztą bardzo wyraźnie widać do dzisiaj wśród kuratorów wielu festiwali teatralnych i tanecznych w Europie.

Kolejny ważny moment w procesie kształtowania się dyskursu skupionego wokół praktyki kuratorskiej to rok 1987. Wówczas powstały pierwsze podyplomowe studia kuratorskie w Europie: pod nazwą l’École du Magasin wprowadziło je centrum sztuki Le Magasin w Grenoble we Francji. Z kolei w USA, również w 1987 roku kurs Art History/Museum Studies w ramach Whitney Independent Study Program (przy Whitney American Museum of Art) został przemianowany na Studia Kuratorskie i Krytyczne. Kurator zatem stał się równocześnie przedmiotem akademickiej nauki i samodzielnym zawodem, oficjalnie zarejestrowanym pośród innych. Sytuacji tej towarzyszył kontekst rozwoju wystaw, biennale i targów sztuki jako podstawowej formy wystawiania prac artystów. W rezultacie pod koniec lat osiemdziesiątych dyskurs wokół kuratorstwa uprawomocnił się i rozwinął – równocześnie z dalszym rozwojem samego zawodu.

Lata dziewięćdziesiąte z kolei to prawdziwa eksplozja biennale i targów sztuki, podczas gdy postać kuratora staje się ważnym elementem krytyki instytucji muzeów oraz sposobów prezentacji sztuki, a kolejni kuratorzy stają się stopniowo postaciami kluczowymi dla lokalnego i międzynarodowego rynku sztuki. Coraz więcej publikuje się rozmów z kuratorami, co oznacza ważną, paradygmatyczną zmianę w myśleniu: kurator bywa równoważny z artystą – to przecież ten ostatni miał dotąd rodzaj monopolu na udzielanie wywiadów. Tymczasem kuratorzy lubią tę formę, ponieważ umożliwia im bieżące komentowanie własnej pracy dokładnie w taki sposób, jakiego by sobie życzyli.

Statusowi kuratora jako „gwiazdy”, który uzurpuje sobie cały sukces wystaw, jednocześnie marginalizując pracę artystów, zaczęła w latach dwutysięcznych towarzyszyć krytyka dotychczasowych praktyk kuratorskich oraz propozycja modelu kolektywnego kuratorstwa. Jednocześnie dyskusja o kuratorach stała się jednym z głównych tematów rozmowy o sztuce w ogóle. To nie przypadek, że w 2003 roku, przy jednym z ważniejszych europejskich biennale, Manifesta, rozpoczęto wydawanie magazynu o tym samym tytule, poświęconego wyłącznie kuratorstwu – to zresztą ciekawe, jak ewoluował jego tytuł: od „pisma o współczesnym kuratorstwie” do „wokół praktyk kuratorskich”. Obok rozmaitych kierunków studiów i specjalności kuratorskich (w Polsce jedyne podyplomowe studia kuratorskie, otwarte w Krakowie przy Instytucie Historii Sztuki UJ w roku akademickim 2005/2006, zostały zawieszone w latach 2011/2012) pojawiły się portale poświęcone wyłącznie tej tematyce, służące integracji, kontaktom oraz porządkowaniu rosnących lawinowo ofert kuratorskich rezydencji, wymiany i konferencji (http://www.callforcurators.com, http://www.curating.org/, http://www.curatorsintl.org/). W samym 2012 roku wydano kilka ważnych publikacji o problematyce kuratorskiej, miedzy innymi Paula O’Neilla The culture of curating and the curating of culture(s), specjalny numer „Texte zur Kunste” a w Polsce Display. Strategie wystawiania oraz Rozmawiając o wystawie, obie pod redakcją Marii Hussakowskiej. Dyskusja o kuratorstwie stała się ważnym elementem rozmowy o strategiach prezentowania sztuki, stanowiąc punkt wyjścia do pytań o współczesny rynek sztuki, rządzące nim mechanizmy, konteksty powstawania i funkcjonowania kolejnych systemów prezentacji sztuki oraz ich konsekwencje estetyczne.

Beatrice von Bismarck tak zdefiniowała, co rozumie pod pojęciem „kuratorskość” (the curatorial), stwierdzając, że jest to „praktyka kulturowa, która wykracza poza zwyczajną organizację wystaw i charakteryzuje się swą własną procedurą służącą produkowaniu, przekazywaniu i refleksji nad doświadczaniem i wiedzą. W ten sposób kuratorskość porzuca reprezentację – wystawy nie są już miejscem rozstawiania wartościowych obiektów i reprezentowania obiektywnych wartości, lecz raczej przestrzenią kuratorskiego działania, w której możliwe są niecodzienne spotkania i dyskursy, w której to, co niemożliwe do zaplanowania wydaje się ważniejsze niż, powiedzmy, staranne plany aranżacji”. Wystawa jest zatem miejscem wydarzeń, spotkań, przestrzenią performatywną bardziej niż (re)prezentacyjną.

Wraz z rozwojem dyskusji o praktykach kuratorskich narodzić się więc musiał nowy nurt krytyki sztuki: nie skupiający się, jak wcześniejsze, na krytyce artystycznej i historii sztuki skoncentrowanej na tym, co wystawiane, ale pytający o instytucjonalne i ideologiczne ramy wystawiania. I w sytuacji gdy zjawisko kuratorstwa obrastało coraz większą ilością kontekstów i narzędzi, panosząc się w krytycznym dyskursie o sztuce, sam zawód kuratora coraz częściej poddawany był krytyce jako niemal wzorcowy owoc późnego kapitalizmu. W chwili, gdy pojedynczy kuratorzy osiągnęli status gwiazd (jak Hans Ulrich Obrist czy Klaus Biesenbach, gloryfikowany w filmie o Marinie Abramović Artystka obecna, gdzie kurator jest tym, który namaszcza i niemalże stwarza artystkę), pojawiły się silne głosy postulujące śmierć kuratora i rezygnację z takiego systemu produkcji sztuki, którego jest reprezentantem i ulubionym dzieckiem.

2.

Na początku lat osiemdziesiątych zawód kuratora zaczął przenikać do teatru. Jego obecność w sztukach performatywnych to konsekwencja takich estetycznych i systemowych zmian w teatrze europejskim, jak odejście artystów od reprezentacji, psychologicznej wiarygodności i linearnej narracji, rozwój festiwali i międzynarodowej współpracy twórców oraz stworzenie nowych przestrzeni, umożliwiających rozwój niezależnych projektów i uruchamiających nowy system pracy, inny od tego, jaki funkcjonował dotąd w teatrach repertuarowych. Późne lata dziewięćdziesiąte przyniosły rozwój niezależnej sceny teatralnej i tanecznej, powstawały kolejne centra sztuk performatywnych, znacznie rozszerzono międzynarodową działalność. Dyskurs krytyki, sytuujący sztuki performatywne w szerokim kontekście współczesnej filozofii, socjologii i kulturoznawstwa stał się z czasem dominujący w odniesieniu do poszukiwań w dziedzinie teatru, a zwłaszcza tańca, wyznaczających nowe ramy myślenia o sztukach performatywnych.

Kurator w sztukach performatywnych do pewnego stopnia przejął wiele obowiązków dyrektora artystycznego: dalej decyduje o tym, którzy artyści rozpoczną pracę nad kolejną produkcją i pojadą na festiwal, a którzy z tego obiegu zostaną wykluczeni. Zmienił się jednak zasięg jego działań: z wertykalnej struktury hierarchii teatru instytucjonalnego w horyzontalną sieć współpracy. Podstawowym narzędziem w codziennej pracy kuratora jest nie tylko intuicja i talent, ale również umiejętność negocjacji: z artystami, z lokalnym i międzynarodowym środowiskiem, z publicznością, mediami, decydentami. Wyjątkowo istotna jest też świadomość kontekstów (społecznych, politycznych, artystycznych, historycznych), w jakich kurator pracuje – jednym z jego zadań jest ich wyszukiwanie, nazywanie i podejmowanie w ich obrębie skutecznego dialogu.

Zmiana hierarchii nie oznacza jednak rozproszenia władzy. W tej chwili w strukturach europejskiego systemu teatralnego pozycja kuratora tak znaczącego festiwalu jak Avignon, Kunsten Festival des Arts, Wiener Festwochen czy Ruhrtriennale to oczywisty awans w hierarchii władzy i wpływów. Dysponując ogromnym budżetem oraz prestiżem kurator ma swobodę wyboru najlepszych i najdroższych światowych twórców, współtworzy z nimi spektakle, staje się w imieniu festiwalu ich koproducentem. Jego wybory wpływają na kształt mainstreamu europejskiego teatru oraz mogą decydować o jego przyszłości.

3.

„Kuratorzy to elokwentni pisarze, nieustraszeni badacze, komunikatywni wychowawcy artystyczni, łatwo adaptujący się interpretatorzy, wyrafinowani krytycy, dumni redaktorzy, skrupulatni i dokładni archiwiści, pełni wyobraźni producenci, społecznie świadomi politycy, twardzi i drobiazgowi finansiści, ludzie o międzynarodowych kontaktach, wrażliwi dyplomaci, sprytni prawnicy, elastyczni kierownicy projektów i stymulujący agitatorzy” – ta definicja zawodu kuratora, zaproponowana przez Beatrice Jeschke, dotyczy wprawdzie sztuk wizualnych, jednak z powodzeniem większość wymienionych tu cech można zaadoptować do kontekstu sztuk performatywnych.

Jednocześnie na gruncie europejskim można wyróżnić co najmniej kilka modeli i obszarów działań kuratora współczesnych szuk performatywnych. Pierwszym z nich, najlepiej widocznym w tak zwanym środowisku teatralnym i tanecznym, jest kurator festiwali o charakterze międzynarodowym. Pośrednik, mediator, inicjator, producent, dramaturg, twórca, sprzedawca? Wymieńmy tylko kilka przykładów Christophe Slagmuylder – Kunsten Festival des Arts, Magda Grudzińska – do  2011 roku dyrektorka i kuratorka Krakowskich Reminiscencji Teatralych, Tilmann Broszat – Spielart, Agata Siwiak – Dialog Czterech Kultur w roku 2008 i 2009, Rose Fenton, LIFT, Gundega Laivina – Homo Novus, Florian Malzahler – od 2013 roku Impulse Festival, wcześniej m.in. Steriischer Herbst. Ciekawe jest tutaj porównanie programowania festiwalu z programowaniem wystawy: festiwal jako forma performatywna odznacza się większą nieprzewidywalnością. Za to kurator festiwalu reakcje widowni widzi właściwie od razu.

Kolejny przykład to kurator miejsca: ośrodka teatralnego i tanecznego, najczęściej stanowiącego element niezależnej sceny lokalnej (co oznacza działanie poza systemem repertuarowym). W tym przypadku rola kuratora rozpięta jest między wcześniejszym pojmowaniem funkcji dyrektora artystycznego i producenta. Działalność kuratorska w tym obszarze charakteryzuje się zerwaniem z hierarchią teatrów repertuarowych i centrów choreograficznych na rzecz międzynarodowej współpracy projektowej. Przykłady praktyk kuratorskich a tym obszarze: Matthias Lilienthal – do 2011 roku dyrektor artystyczny Hebbel am Ufer, Kathrin Tiedemann – Forum Freies Theater, Sven Birkeland – BIT Theatergarasjen, Gyorgyi Szabó – Trafó, Joanna Leśnierowska – Art Stations Foundation, Stefan Hilterhaus – PACT Zollverein. Warto tu zauważyć, że o ile w Europie Zachodniej wkraczanie zawodu kuratora miało charakter procesualny, o tyle w Polsce przebiega na zasadzie zderzenia, dość gwałtownej fuzji z dotychczasowym, monopolizującym polską scenę teatralną modelem teatru publicznego, repertuarowego.

Możemy mówić także: o zjawisku kuratorstwa w państwowych instytucjach promujących kulturę na scenie międzynarodowej, co dotyczy przede wszystkim dyplomacji kulturalnej. O artystach przejmujących obowiązki kuratora. O kuratorach niezależnych, nie związanych na stałe z żadną konkretną instytucją, skupionych na działalności projektowej, często pracujących w obszarze międzynarodowym.

4.

Dlaczego kurator? Zawód, który w ostatnich dziesięcioleciach stał się kluczowy dla rozwoju sztuk wizualnych, w niezwykle istotnym stopniu wpływa więc również na kształt współczesnych sztuk performatywnych. Jego pojawienie się i rosnące znaczenie wydaje się symptomatyczne wobec przemian estetycznych i kulturowych w dziedzinie teatru i tańca w ostatnich dwudziestu latach. Festiwalizacja życia teatralnego i tanecznego, rozwój instytucji alternatywnych wobec teatrów repertuarowych i centrów choreograficznych, takich jak domy produkcyjne, interdyscyplinarne ośrodki niezależne; wreszcie obecność międzynarodowych platform, sieci, laboratoriów oraz pozaakademickich ośrodków badawczych pokazuje, że jesteśmy świadkami kluczowych przemian modelu funkcjonowania teatru w społeczeństwie, a w konsekwencji także zmian statusu artysty i widza. Co istotne, zjawisko kuratorstwa wprowadza perspektywę krytyczną wobec instytucji i mechanizmów, w jakich funkcjonuje teatr i taniec w Europie, pozwalając na ponowne ich przemyślenie i proponowanie nowych rozwiązań.

Zadanie kuratorów to przede wszystkim wybór – obarczony wielką odpowiedzialnością i przebiegający według zróżnicowanych, nie do końca jasnych kryteriów. Kurator decyduje o tym, który z artystów będzie obecny w programie festiwalu czy danego miejsca (ośrodka, teatru), a który nie będzie miał tam wstępu; kto zostanie tym samym włączony do „obiegu”, do tego niewielkiego kręgu artystów oglądanych, komentowanych, opisywanych i zapraszanych na kolejne festiwale, a kto zostanie z tego obiegu wykluczony. Szczególne znaczenie rola kuratora odgrywa w obiegu międzynarodowym, kształtowanym niemal wyłącznie przez programy festiwalowe, a więc decyzje kuratorskie.

Niejasność nie tylko kryteriów wyboru, ale w ogóle roli kuratora w świecie sztuki pozostaje problemem przede wszystkim dla artystów. Świetnie opisuje tę sytuację Rabih Mroué: „my knowledge about curators comes from my role as an artist and the artist/curator relationship. As for what happens before or after, it seems to me that artists do not attempt to understand how these aspects function. As if it is not our concern.” Libański artysta pisze o pytaniach, na które nie zna odpowiedzi, chociaż jest świadom, że dotyczą one zasad funkcjonowania mechanizmu, którego sam jest częścią: jak kuratorzy zdobywają środki na projekty? jak je zabezpieczają i co muszę zaoferować w zamian? na jakiej podstawie sponsorzy i fundatorzy godzą się na finansowanie wydarzeń artystycznych? na jakiej płaszczyźnie kuratorzy znajdują z nimi wspólny język i negocjują warunki? w jaki sposób projekty są rozliczane, co kuratorzy muszą udowodnić, przedstawić fundatorom i sponsorom? co stoi za strategicznymi decyzjami wyboru tego akurat regionu lub tego akurat tematu jako wiodącego w danym momencie? dlaczego ci sami artyści jednego dnia zapraszani są wszędzie, innego kompletnie zapominani? co w tym systemie odgrywa większą rolę: polityka, ideologie, kultura, propaganda, strategie marketingowe czy wszystko na raz? kto ma większą władzę i większy wpływ na decyzje: donatorzy czy kuratorzy?

Jeżeli zatem najważniejszą postacią dla teatru europejskiego w dziewiętnastym wieku był aktor, wiek dwudziesty został zdominowany przez reżysera, to początek dwudziestego pierwszego stulecia jak dotąd należy do kuratora. Paul O’Neill pisze, że „badanie praktyk kuratorskich to odkrywanie sposobów, w jakie sztuka jest wystawiana, w jaki sposób zapośredniczana, jak komunikowana i dyskutowana w kontekście historii wystaw. Pisanie o którymkolwiek aspekcie kuratorstwa jest refleksją nad tym, w jaki sposób wystawa sztuki stała się częścią procesu jej rozwoju i rozważania sposobów, w jakie sztuka w tym kontekście jest rozumiana.”

Ale co może najważniejsze, zjawisko kuratorstwa prowokuje nowy kierunek myślenia o sztukach performatywnych, o tym po co i dla kogo powstają. Ten nurt to owoc zmian w samej sztuce, ale też w sposobie jej wytwarzania i dystrybucji; owoc reguł systemu późnego kapitalizmu poprzemysłowego, której ważnym elementem (paradoksalnie?) jest krytyka nie tyle spektakli, ile warunków ich prezentowania i produkcji, kontekstu społecznego, ekonomicznego i politycznego, wreszcie krytyka instytucji, które dyktują warunki pracy, wpływające z kolei na wybory estetyczne. Dyskusja o teatrze i tańcu z niszowych magazynów krytycznych przenosi się w przestrzenie festiwali i ośrodków sztuk performatywnych, krytyczne analizy ustępują miejsca debacie i negocjacjom, a przedmiotem jej zainteresowania nie jest iluzja i reprezentacja rzeczywistości, ale doświadczenie widzów, sposób konstruowania i obnażania ram spektaklu oraz kontekst wydarzenia.

Tekst ukazał się w „Dialogu” nr 9/2013